How do we find them?

So, how do we make contact with the next generation? Where are the 20 and 30 somethings who are curious about weaving? I think many are finding rh looms and getting involved in weaving that way. I would love to know how to engage the men and women in this age group, I know Facebook and MySpace and Ravelry. anywhere else? Are they mostly online? do the ones who love fiber do everything online? I would love to hear what you think. Claudia

Comments

Posted on Fri, 06/19/2009 - 00:24

 I don't know if it's that easy.  I started knitting, spinning, and finally weaving in my mid to late-20s, but growing up I had a mother that taught me to sew and do other hand crafts.  I'm also single with a decent job, and therefore have the disposable income it takes for some of my endeavors.  That fact that I'm a male makes it even a little more unusual.

I worked with a program in my home city that teaches weaving during the Summer to kids in grades 1-8.  It was a wonderful experience, and I think one of those things they'll never forget.  It's those types of memories that in the future, if they don't continue at that point, may bring them back to weaving or other related interests.

I moved, and am no longer a part of the program.  However, I'm looking for ways in my new community to get kids involved.  I have to admit that it's a bit tougher because I live in a somewhat rural area, and a lot of the kids in 4-H, etc. have other things they're focused on which are more agrarian in nature.  However, as we know, it only takes making that connection with a handful of people over the years to keep things move ahead.

I think another factor making things difficult is the decline in the arts programs through schools.  It's hard to know all of the wonderful things that are out there when you don't have that kind of exposure.  I know I'm pushing my local art group, which puts on the annual art fair, to include demonstrations.  I fully believe that not only could it pique the interest of individuals towards the arts (or a specific medium), but it gives them a better understanding of the skill put into art, handcrafts, etc. that they may take for granted. 

I'd love to hear ideas about how others have been involved in programs in their communities that have been successful long term with either children, or young adults, as Claudia posted above.

Posted on Fri, 06/19/2009 - 03:42

Claudia, I don't know how to find new weavers.  I myself discovered knitting in my early 20's (in the early 80's) and fell in love right away.  I was intrigued by weaving as well, but it seemed so daunting -- so much equipment, such a steep learning curve -- it seemed like you had to be really committed to the idea of weaving before you even started.

I have heard of guilds that have looms available, where people can just come in and weave.  I think I would have taken advantage of that as a 20 year old, as long as I didn't feel like I was intruding into a private space , or that I would have to make a commitment when I just wanted to fool around a little.

It's an interesting thing to think about.  As it turns out, it has taken me 20+ years since that discovery of knitting to start weaving seriously.  Well, not seriously, but at least often!  That's a pretty slow conversion.

Posted on Sun, 06/21/2009 - 11:47

Morning all,

I got folks interested in Fiber arts by going to local Fairs with my spinning wheel. It's amazing how many people stop to watch & ask questions. I had a book for contact info for them to fill in as well as cards with all my info for them to take. That started parents asking to have me teach their kids, then themselves. I volunteered to go to the schools which spawned 2 4-H groups!

I have an adult group that meets at my home on Wednesday evenings. Some knit, some spin, some weave. It is a costly art but we all trade fiber, patterns & ideas. I recently got a RH loom to teach the kids on as it's less daunting & more portable. At our local 4-H Camp we've offered Mom (or Dad) & me workshops. There has been some response to these but not as much as I'd like. Everyone is very busy these days.

I think word of mouth is my best source. I always bring knitting with me everywhere. That'll get people talking to you & spark interest. Recently I was reading a weaving manual while sitting in the hospital  family waiting room. The lady next to me asked about the book, which lead to weaving, then spinning, then knitting.Before I knew it 3 hrs had gone by! I invited her to join our small spinning group. That's how I spread the good word of Fiber. One person at a time!!!

Lynn

 

Posted on Sun, 06/21/2009 - 19:40

 Lynn,

I think you hit on something very important in there, "Everyone is very busy these days."  It seems like everyone is always rushing to this or that, and everything needs to be done in a hurry.  I think to really appreciate what we do, it takes a certain ability to slow down, realize the importance of that time, and use it as we see fit.

I used to spend a lot of time working to get ahead (and I still do to a point), but I also take time to do the things I enjoy... the things that will, in the long run, sustain me.

I like that you've gotten out there and done public demonstrations.  It's something, as stated in my initial message, that I keep trying to get out local group to do.  I don't understand why they find it so difficult to grasp, and maybe it's because they've always kept their art private.  I take as many opportunities to do it as I can.

Keep up the good working in being involved and getting others involved.  It's hard sometimes, but I think even hooking a few people is well worth the time and effort.

Patrick

Posted on Sun, 07/05/2009 - 13:02

Hi there.  I'm also looking for new weavers.  I have taught several children and their parents to weave on an inkle loom.  Public demonstrations are a great ice breaker.  Our guild participates in group demonstrrations in such unlikely places as grocery stores.  One member likes to go to his small town and spin outside of the cafe.  Spinning is easier to do in public, but if you have some handwoven fabric along, you have a seque into weaving.  Small looms are also good for demonstrations.  Inkle, backstrap, frame looms, etc.  I carry a spindle and some fiber wherever I go.  Last night it was a birthday party, and I was spinning grey angora from my bunnies.  No takers last night, but some curious onlookers.

I think homeschoolers and their parents are likely candidates.  They are into dyi, back to basics, etc.  I have a wool processing mill here on our farm.  I had a bunch of this group come by for a tour of the farm and mill.  Several of the moms are into spinning, knitting, weaving and/or felting.  You could contact a local homeschooling group, and if they aren't already into it, they may be interested in learning weaving.  My group went home with three bags full of colorful wool for felting and spinning projects.

I agree, Patric, it is worth the effort to go a little out of our way to find those who want to learn.  Very rewarding.

Aunt Janet

Posted on Sat, 07/18/2009 - 03:01

Since 2006 I have been taking my Saori loom to public and community events to weave banners for Peace, the Environment, the specific community and just to invite people to try it out.  I have had over 1200 people try out weaving in this way.

We have made banners for Hiroshima (Saori Peace Weave 2007 & 2008), for the Downtown Eastside Women's Centre (in Vancouver, BC), a Peace Banner that was sent to Somalia, another to Ottawa, Canada for some Peace Events, two for the community of Gibson's Landing, BC for their community recreation centre as part of their Fibre Festival, an Environmental Banner for the local Sustainability Centre conference room table, for schools and the list goes on.

From this, many people have been introduced to weaving and a lot have gone on to take classes through our guild, at my studio and with other weaving instructors.  Some have just enjoyed the experience and contributing to 'Weaving with a Purpose'.

At these events I have had all ages, from young children on the laps of their parents to the grandparents.  I often put on a colourful rainbow warp and bring a basket of all colours and textures of yarn.  Each person winds their own bobbin up and weaves a section of the banner.   With Saori weaving, there are no rules and no mistakes so people relax and sit down to try it - not having to worry about doing it 'right or wrong' - it is all great and colourful. 

You can see some of the completed banners on my website at - www.saltspringweaving.com/news.htm

Happy Weaving,

Terri

 

Posted on Sat, 07/18/2009 - 12:33

There's something magical about weaving.  Taking individual yarns or threads or fibers and making a cloth amazes me every time I do it and it's been over 30 years!  As an art teacher I always incorporated weaving into my classes.  Because we did not have looms or the funds to purchase looms for an entire class... we wove on cardboard.  It's affordable and works well as an introduction to the wonders of weaving and to understanding the way warp and weft cross to make a fabric.  

Whatever, we, as weavers can do to not only SHOW people by demonstrating but have them get their hands on it and TRY IT themselves we can promote the craft.  We can do this anywhere -- not only at organized fairs and farmers markets but at everyday places like on lunch breaks in a workplace or mall or while waiting for a bus.  Of course weaving on a floor loom outside of your studio takes some planning, but rigid heddle looms and backstrap looms and weave-its and yes, even cardboard looms are very, very portable.

Another problem is getting people to participate in guilds.  This online network of weavers is amazing and fills some of the needs we as weavers have to share, but getting together with others to show what you've done and to plan ways to share with others is also very important.  You can do it yourself in the comfort of your home online, but I think you really need to get out there and connect eye to eye and hand to hand with others.  I'm curious what guilds are doing to recruit and involve the younger folk.

Posted on Wed, 07/29/2009 - 22:57

Speeking as one of the 20-somethings you want to attract to weaving I think that a couple of the points above are really good. Cost, oppotunity, and timing are why I did not cosider trying weaving for most of my 20's.

 I remember my mom talking about weaving when she was in college, but my dad was allergic to wool and fiber fluff, so she stopped. I bounced from craft to craft, nothing really grabbed my attention for longer than a single project.

I was lucky enough to find a weaving shop near my office that offered 4 one hour beginner lessons for $40. Since I was just starting out in my job, cheap was a must. The fact that I got to use her loom before I made a commitment to buying one, and the fact that I could go on my lunch hour really helped.

I have now been weaving for 3 years, and I love it. My mom bought me my first loom when she saw how much I loved it. I am very thankful for the online weaving communities, because it seems like all the guilds that meet in my area meet mid day during the week when I am at work.

I have taught carboard loom weaving at Girl Scout events, and I auctioned off free classes in learning to weave a tabby scarf at a work fundraiser last year. I hauled my Rigid Heddle loom into the office and took over a conference room for several days at lunch for that.

Good Luck contiuing to spread the word to others.

Posted on Thu, 09/03/2009 - 02:33

We are starting a folk art school here in central Illinois and have an internship program. When we teach classes we waive the fee for a student in exchange for some help with set up and clean up. For my last class I had a 20+ person who might not have been able to afford the class but brought much enthusiasm and joy to our class. She came to our folk art guild meeting the next week with  her finished handbag and it was adorable!

I am also interested in teaching young students and have considered having a drop in day for neighborhood kids in my weaving studio. Has anyone done this? I know of a sewing instructor in North Bay Ontario that has a group of teens that have a sewing club in her sewing school that is attached to her house. They have turned into quite a group and she has even taken them to New York to see the fashion district!

Posted on Fri, 09/11/2009 - 18:30

You found one! I think Weavolution itself is a great way to keep the teenagers and twentysomethings interested. They're attracted to anything on the web these days and having a "Facebook for weavers" can really help keep them motivated.

I'm Careena, 17, president of a newly formed 4-H Fiber Club in East Berlin (half-hour out of Gettysburg). The first year we got about 20 kids who'd never even been in 4-H before. Our leader gave a lot of farm tours last year to kids, and found out there was such an interest in it. She posted flyers at the grocery store, the yarn store, and the hardware store. After that, it really spread by word of mouth. My sisters brought a friend, who brought a friend. I had a girl come up to me at last night's meeting saying she had a friend who wanted to come. Our instructors also help to transmit the enthusiasm. We meet at The Mannings Handweaving School and Supply Center (just sitting in a yarn shop conducting meetings is enough to get your interest peaked), Tom Knisely is our spinning instructor, and his daughter Sara is our weaving teacher. Anybody who knows them knows they are capable of such encouragement to the next generation.

Careena

Posted on Sun, 09/20/2009 - 16:59

Hello Everyone,

Just found the group and wanted to say that my little local library is a great source of kids, ages 8-15.  So far I've done 2 programs - an after school which was 1 hour a week for 4 weeks and the other was summer camp which ran 1 hour,  4 days in a row. The children's librarian is very enthusiastic and we're making plans for Dec. and then Feb.  I even get paid a small fee and work with materials donated or sometimes paid for.  Since the library closes at 6, I haven't managed to get an adult class going. 

I'd also like to point out that several of the posts and even the forum description is a bit sexist or biased in view point ... only mentioning girl scouts - some of the best weavers in the kids classes have been boys and the classes have been almost evenly split male to female.  Liese

 

Posted on Fri, 06/19/2009 - 00:24

 I don't know if it's that easy.  I started knitting, spinning, and finally weaving in my mid to late-20s, but growing up I had a mother that taught me to sew and do other hand crafts.  I'm also single with a decent job, and therefore have the disposable income it takes for some of my endeavors.  That fact that I'm a male makes it even a little more unusual.

I worked with a program in my home city that teaches weaving during the Summer to kids in grades 1-8.  It was a wonderful experience, and I think one of those things they'll never forget.  It's those types of memories that in the future, if they don't continue at that point, may bring them back to weaving or other related interests.

I moved, and am no longer a part of the program.  However, I'm looking for ways in my new community to get kids involved.  I have to admit that it's a bit tougher because I live in a somewhat rural area, and a lot of the kids in 4-H, etc. have other things they're focused on which are more agrarian in nature.  However, as we know, it only takes making that connection with a handful of people over the years to keep things move ahead.

I think another factor making things difficult is the decline in the arts programs through schools.  It's hard to know all of the wonderful things that are out there when you don't have that kind of exposure.  I know I'm pushing my local art group, which puts on the annual art fair, to include demonstrations.  I fully believe that not only could it pique the interest of individuals towards the arts (or a specific medium), but it gives them a better understanding of the skill put into art, handcrafts, etc. that they may take for granted. 

I'd love to hear ideas about how others have been involved in programs in their communities that have been successful long term with either children, or young adults, as Claudia posted above.

Posted on Fri, 06/19/2009 - 03:42

Claudia, I don't know how to find new weavers.  I myself discovered knitting in my early 20's (in the early 80's) and fell in love right away.  I was intrigued by weaving as well, but it seemed so daunting -- so much equipment, such a steep learning curve -- it seemed like you had to be really committed to the idea of weaving before you even started.

I have heard of guilds that have looms available, where people can just come in and weave.  I think I would have taken advantage of that as a 20 year old, as long as I didn't feel like I was intruding into a private space , or that I would have to make a commitment when I just wanted to fool around a little.

It's an interesting thing to think about.  As it turns out, it has taken me 20+ years since that discovery of knitting to start weaving seriously.  Well, not seriously, but at least often!  That's a pretty slow conversion.

Posted on Sun, 06/21/2009 - 11:47

Morning all,

I got folks interested in Fiber arts by going to local Fairs with my spinning wheel. It's amazing how many people stop to watch & ask questions. I had a book for contact info for them to fill in as well as cards with all my info for them to take. That started parents asking to have me teach their kids, then themselves. I volunteered to go to the schools which spawned 2 4-H groups!

I have an adult group that meets at my home on Wednesday evenings. Some knit, some spin, some weave. It is a costly art but we all trade fiber, patterns & ideas. I recently got a RH loom to teach the kids on as it's less daunting & more portable. At our local 4-H Camp we've offered Mom (or Dad) & me workshops. There has been some response to these but not as much as I'd like. Everyone is very busy these days.

I think word of mouth is my best source. I always bring knitting with me everywhere. That'll get people talking to you & spark interest. Recently I was reading a weaving manual while sitting in the hospital  family waiting room. The lady next to me asked about the book, which lead to weaving, then spinning, then knitting.Before I knew it 3 hrs had gone by! I invited her to join our small spinning group. That's how I spread the good word of Fiber. One person at a time!!!

Lynn

 

Posted on Sun, 06/21/2009 - 19:40

 Lynn,

I think you hit on something very important in there, "Everyone is very busy these days."  It seems like everyone is always rushing to this or that, and everything needs to be done in a hurry.  I think to really appreciate what we do, it takes a certain ability to slow down, realize the importance of that time, and use it as we see fit.

I used to spend a lot of time working to get ahead (and I still do to a point), but I also take time to do the things I enjoy... the things that will, in the long run, sustain me.

I like that you've gotten out there and done public demonstrations.  It's something, as stated in my initial message, that I keep trying to get out local group to do.  I don't understand why they find it so difficult to grasp, and maybe it's because they've always kept their art private.  I take as many opportunities to do it as I can.

Keep up the good working in being involved and getting others involved.  It's hard sometimes, but I think even hooking a few people is well worth the time and effort.

Patrick

Posted on Sun, 07/05/2009 - 13:02

Hi there.  I'm also looking for new weavers.  I have taught several children and their parents to weave on an inkle loom.  Public demonstrations are a great ice breaker.  Our guild participates in group demonstrrations in such unlikely places as grocery stores.  One member likes to go to his small town and spin outside of the cafe.  Spinning is easier to do in public, but if you have some handwoven fabric along, you have a seque into weaving.  Small looms are also good for demonstrations.  Inkle, backstrap, frame looms, etc.  I carry a spindle and some fiber wherever I go.  Last night it was a birthday party, and I was spinning grey angora from my bunnies.  No takers last night, but some curious onlookers.

I think homeschoolers and their parents are likely candidates.  They are into dyi, back to basics, etc.  I have a wool processing mill here on our farm.  I had a bunch of this group come by for a tour of the farm and mill.  Several of the moms are into spinning, knitting, weaving and/or felting.  You could contact a local homeschooling group, and if they aren't already into it, they may be interested in learning weaving.  My group went home with three bags full of colorful wool for felting and spinning projects.

I agree, Patric, it is worth the effort to go a little out of our way to find those who want to learn.  Very rewarding.

Aunt Janet

Posted on Sat, 07/18/2009 - 03:01

Since 2006 I have been taking my Saori loom to public and community events to weave banners for Peace, the Environment, the specific community and just to invite people to try it out.  I have had over 1200 people try out weaving in this way.

We have made banners for Hiroshima (Saori Peace Weave 2007 & 2008), for the Downtown Eastside Women's Centre (in Vancouver, BC), a Peace Banner that was sent to Somalia, another to Ottawa, Canada for some Peace Events, two for the community of Gibson's Landing, BC for their community recreation centre as part of their Fibre Festival, an Environmental Banner for the local Sustainability Centre conference room table, for schools and the list goes on.

From this, many people have been introduced to weaving and a lot have gone on to take classes through our guild, at my studio and with other weaving instructors.  Some have just enjoyed the experience and contributing to 'Weaving with a Purpose'.

At these events I have had all ages, from young children on the laps of their parents to the grandparents.  I often put on a colourful rainbow warp and bring a basket of all colours and textures of yarn.  Each person winds their own bobbin up and weaves a section of the banner.   With Saori weaving, there are no rules and no mistakes so people relax and sit down to try it - not having to worry about doing it 'right or wrong' - it is all great and colourful. 

You can see some of the completed banners on my website at - www.saltspringweaving.com/news.htm

Happy Weaving,

Terri

 

Posted on Sat, 07/18/2009 - 12:33

There's something magical about weaving.  Taking individual yarns or threads or fibers and making a cloth amazes me every time I do it and it's been over 30 years!  As an art teacher I always incorporated weaving into my classes.  Because we did not have looms or the funds to purchase looms for an entire class... we wove on cardboard.  It's affordable and works well as an introduction to the wonders of weaving and to understanding the way warp and weft cross to make a fabric.  

Whatever, we, as weavers can do to not only SHOW people by demonstrating but have them get their hands on it and TRY IT themselves we can promote the craft.  We can do this anywhere -- not only at organized fairs and farmers markets but at everyday places like on lunch breaks in a workplace or mall or while waiting for a bus.  Of course weaving on a floor loom outside of your studio takes some planning, but rigid heddle looms and backstrap looms and weave-its and yes, even cardboard looms are very, very portable.

Another problem is getting people to participate in guilds.  This online network of weavers is amazing and fills some of the needs we as weavers have to share, but getting together with others to show what you've done and to plan ways to share with others is also very important.  You can do it yourself in the comfort of your home online, but I think you really need to get out there and connect eye to eye and hand to hand with others.  I'm curious what guilds are doing to recruit and involve the younger folk.

Posted on Wed, 07/29/2009 - 22:57

Speeking as one of the 20-somethings you want to attract to weaving I think that a couple of the points above are really good. Cost, oppotunity, and timing are why I did not cosider trying weaving for most of my 20's.

 I remember my mom talking about weaving when she was in college, but my dad was allergic to wool and fiber fluff, so she stopped. I bounced from craft to craft, nothing really grabbed my attention for longer than a single project.

I was lucky enough to find a weaving shop near my office that offered 4 one hour beginner lessons for $40. Since I was just starting out in my job, cheap was a must. The fact that I got to use her loom before I made a commitment to buying one, and the fact that I could go on my lunch hour really helped.

I have now been weaving for 3 years, and I love it. My mom bought me my first loom when she saw how much I loved it. I am very thankful for the online weaving communities, because it seems like all the guilds that meet in my area meet mid day during the week when I am at work.

I have taught carboard loom weaving at Girl Scout events, and I auctioned off free classes in learning to weave a tabby scarf at a work fundraiser last year. I hauled my Rigid Heddle loom into the office and took over a conference room for several days at lunch for that.

Good Luck contiuing to spread the word to others.

Posted on Thu, 09/03/2009 - 02:33

We are starting a folk art school here in central Illinois and have an internship program. When we teach classes we waive the fee for a student in exchange for some help with set up and clean up. For my last class I had a 20+ person who might not have been able to afford the class but brought much enthusiasm and joy to our class. She came to our folk art guild meeting the next week with  her finished handbag and it was adorable!

I am also interested in teaching young students and have considered having a drop in day for neighborhood kids in my weaving studio. Has anyone done this? I know of a sewing instructor in North Bay Ontario that has a group of teens that have a sewing club in her sewing school that is attached to her house. They have turned into quite a group and she has even taken them to New York to see the fashion district!

Posted on Fri, 09/11/2009 - 18:30

You found one! I think Weavolution itself is a great way to keep the teenagers and twentysomethings interested. They're attracted to anything on the web these days and having a "Facebook for weavers" can really help keep them motivated.

I'm Careena, 17, president of a newly formed 4-H Fiber Club in East Berlin (half-hour out of Gettysburg). The first year we got about 20 kids who'd never even been in 4-H before. Our leader gave a lot of farm tours last year to kids, and found out there was such an interest in it. She posted flyers at the grocery store, the yarn store, and the hardware store. After that, it really spread by word of mouth. My sisters brought a friend, who brought a friend. I had a girl come up to me at last night's meeting saying she had a friend who wanted to come. Our instructors also help to transmit the enthusiasm. We meet at The Mannings Handweaving School and Supply Center (just sitting in a yarn shop conducting meetings is enough to get your interest peaked), Tom Knisely is our spinning instructor, and his daughter Sara is our weaving teacher. Anybody who knows them knows they are capable of such encouragement to the next generation.

Careena

Posted on Sun, 09/20/2009 - 16:59

Hello Everyone,

Just found the group and wanted to say that my little local library is a great source of kids, ages 8-15.  So far I've done 2 programs - an after school which was 1 hour a week for 4 weeks and the other was summer camp which ran 1 hour,  4 days in a row. The children's librarian is very enthusiastic and we're making plans for Dec. and then Feb.  I even get paid a small fee and work with materials donated or sometimes paid for.  Since the library closes at 6, I haven't managed to get an adult class going. 

I'd also like to point out that several of the posts and even the forum description is a bit sexist or biased in view point ... only mentioning girl scouts - some of the best weavers in the kids classes have been boys and the classes have been almost evenly split male to female.  Liese

 

Posted on Fri, 07/12/2013 - 16:55

Just a suggestion, I know this is an old thread, but for those perusing the forum as I am, the best way to grab these kids? Sit outside a Dunkin Donuts with a loom and just weave...they will be attracted like Bees to Honey.  Free donut holes would help... : ) 

Posted on Fri, 07/12/2013 - 21:57

Many of the 20 to 30 year old folks I know are starting their careers, marriages, and families. They are working, commuting, and dealing with child care, short of time, and often money, too.

Events that offer child care might help, if you want their undivided attention for any extended period of time?

Posted on Fri, 07/12/2013 - 21:57

Many of the 20 to 30 year old folks I know are starting their careers, marriages, and families. They are working, commuting, and dealing with child care, short of time, and often money, too.

Events that offer child care might help, if you want their undivided attention for any extended period of time?

Posted on Sat, 07/13/2013 - 13:33

Now that you mention it, people in the 20's - 30's are very hard to reach, most likely for the reasons stated above.

Our guild averages a little over one public outreach program a month, not counting our monthly public spin-along or efforts by individuals.  About a third are aimed at grade school kids.  In this age bracket, we tend to recruit rural kids, possibly because of their connections to fiber animals.  In the lower grades, little boys love the mechanics of looms.

Many of us take our spindles to anywhere we have to wait -- dr's offices, car mechanics shops, etc.  The car mechanics can immediately get into spinning wheel or loom design issues.

But I also have a goodly number of college-thru-PhD age people floating through my life and house.  Our guild does at least one program annually at the U of A.  There just does not seem to be the interest there.  That was not the case when my husband started teaching history and would have me come in and give demos in pre-industrial textile production techniques.  People had PCs back then, and some of us had arpanet access, but the Internet as it is now (we used gophers not browsers back then) and it's related technologies were not around.  Is this what changed?  Instant gratification of at least questions?

I've seen two main issues.  Access to looms is part of it, but access to skills is the second half.  If the experience produces a positive result without frustration, that is good.  If it is purely "programatic" like a kit, though, it is not that appealing.  That's the dilemma.  Second, I see an unwillingness to commit to longer-term projects that are not yet part of their over all life plan.  This group of 20-30 year olds seem less willing to explore.  Did their parents do too much exploring?

All or almost all of the people in the "target" age bracket are in or finished with college, so they may be more driven by their life plans than most.  But I don't encounter other people in this age bracket.  They don't come to demos at the state parks or alpaca shows, or if they do, they don't stop and talk to us.  What do they do with their lives -- the ones that are not software engineers, historians-to-be, biologists, or physicists?