Problems with ribs occurring in my weave on a Toika Countermarche floor loom

<p>Hi everyone,&nbsp;My first time posting on&nbsp;weavolution and I am looking for some help. I bought&nbsp;a new Toika loom at the beginning of the year and my first 4 rugs were ok however this last one has become so ribbed and it isnt&nbsp;a problem I have encountered before and I&#39;m not sure how to fix it. Could anyone tell me why it is happening? I suspect it is a tension thing though I did not weave under higher or lower tension than previously, in fact I havent&nbsp;changed anything really to my knowledge so im&nbsp;a bit lost.&nbsp;Thank you, Nancy</p>

Comments

Posted on Fri, 03/26/2021 - 19:42

What kind of ribs are you seeing?  Warpwise?  Weft ribs?  What kind of warp and weft are you using, and what is different from the previous pieces?

Posted on Fri, 03/26/2021 - 20:23

<p>So the ribs are showing in the weft (thick pure wool) running in the direction of the warp (12/15 cotton). I&#39;m working at 4epi. They show every other warp in patches&nbsp;which made me think tension. Not sure if my photo&nbsp;is showing on the post or not. Nothing has changed intentionally since the last rug, warp, weft, sett and tie up are all the same.&nbsp;</p>

Posted on Sat, 03/27/2021 - 21:29

What weave structure, warp and weft are you using?  

Posted on Sat, 03/27/2021 - 23:46

<p>Hi, thanks for getting back to me sorry I seem to be&nbsp;being so unhelpful with information. It is just a plain tabby weave weft facing. Im&nbsp;using chunky wool for the weft not sure exactly what gauge, around 7WPI. Using cotton warp 12/15 at 4epi sleighed every other dent in an 8 dent reed. 4 shafts. 40inches weaving width.&nbsp;I had woven 2 other rugs on the same warp and had them on the cloth beam still. The warp will have been on the loom for several weeks so I am wondering whether the tension may&nbsp;have gone or become uneven over that time and that that maybe the reason. But I&#39;m just not sure.&nbsp;I have warped up another and will see if it happens again but would love input if anything springs to mind.</p><p>Thanks again, Nancy</p>

Posted on Sun, 03/28/2021 - 02:12

If you had some uneveness in the tension when the warp was applied to the beam, it may show up part way through the weave (it may not be visible at first).  This is especially true if you did not use sticks or paper to keep layers of warp from cutting into lower layers.  Strum your warp; feel if some threads are looser than others.  The threads that are tighter may be causing the ribs. If you have a few loose threads, you can pull a loop forward and pin it against the fabric.  For a lot of loose threads, you may have to tie on again, or weight groups of threads behind the loom.  To avoid this, be sure be beam your warp under a lot of tension, and use sticks or paper between layers of warp (unless you have a sectional beam).  For a severe case of varied tension, the warp can be pulled forward, under tension, through the heddles and reed, and rewound on the beam, also under tension.  Time by itself, doesn't change tension.  If the warp is not applied under even tension, and packing (sticks, paper) used to prevent threads cuttining into lower layers, the tension can change.  On a 30 to 50" warp, I use 2 or 4 gallon jugs about 2/3 full of water, for a total of about 20 pounds of weight.

Posted on Sun, 03/28/2021 - 02:12

If you had some uneveness in the tension when the warp was applied to the beam, it may show up part way through the weave (it may not be visible at first).  This is especially true if you did not use sticks or paper to keep layers of warp from cutting into lower layers.  Strum your warp; feel if some threads are looser than others.  The threads that are tighter may be causing the ribs. If you have a few loose threads, you can pull a loop forward and pin it against the fabric.  For a lot of loose threads, you may have to tie on again, or weight groups of threads behind the loom.  To avoid this, be sure be beam your warp under a lot of tension, and use sticks or paper between layers of warp (unless you have a sectional beam).  For a severe case of varied tension, the warp can be pulled forward, under tension, through the heddles and reed, and rewound on the beam, also under tension.  Time by itself, doesn't change tension.  If the warp is not applied under even tension, and packing (sticks, paper) used to prevent threads cuttining into lower layers, the tension can change.  On a 30 to 50" warp, I use 2 or 4 gallon jugs about 2/3 full of water, for a total of about 20 pounds of weight.

Posted on Sun, 03/28/2021 - 08:28

<p>Amazing, thank you for all that advice. I did use paper and sticks but I do think my warp tension was uneven and I have found this Toika much harder to warp up successfully, it is just so big! The water trick spunds&nbsp;brilliant and I will definitely use that. I also suddenly remembered that I had to retie&nbsp;one of the shafts before this rug and I think it was hanging a bit high, which I suppose may have had an effect on already uneven tension. So I will re tie that and warp up with a bucket of water and see if I can get the next one better. Thank you for your suggestions. I appreciate it. Nancy</p>