Help! Diagonal fell line

<p>Super frustrated new weaver here! Hoping someone with more expertise can help me out. I am doing a plain weave project on a 15in Cricket loom with a 12 dent reed. I&#39;m about 8 inches into my project and I&#39;ve noticed that my left side is about a half centimeter taller than the right. My attempts to fix it have resulted in a wavy uneven mess on the right side. Thoughts on what I might be doing wrong? And is there any way to adjust when I&#39;m this far into to project?</p><p>One mistake I already noticed is that I warped the loom one slat off center. Not sure if that could be pulling the left side up, or if it&#39;s more likely how I&#39;m beating. The warp tension feels even when I pat it.&nbsp;</p>

Comments

Posted on Fri, 04/03/2020 - 04:57

<p>This is a problem I have been having as well.&nbsp; My first few projects were fine, but now I sag on the left side and so I&#39;ll be looking for ideas to how to fix this problem as well.&nbsp; Thanks,</p><p>&nbsp;</p>

<p>maryga</p>

Posted on Fri, 04/03/2020 - 15:15

When the fell becomes something other thatn a straight line (wavy, sloped, curved) it is because the tension is not even across the warp.  You say that it feels even, but it isn't.  There are ways of dealing with this on a floor loom, but I"m not sure how they would apply to a rigid heddle.  You can cut the work off and retie.  You can roll sticks up in the cloth (the same way you use sticks to wind the warp).  You can use pieces of paper towel folded into hard triangles to tighten up a selvedge (this will not work on very slick threads).  Hope this gives you some ideas.

Posted on Fri, 04/03/2020 - 15:15

When the fell becomes something other thatn a straight line (wavy, sloped, curved) it is because the tension is not even across the warp.  You say that it feels even, but it isn't.  There are ways of dealing with this on a floor loom, but I"m not sure how they would apply to a rigid heddle.  You can cut the work off and retie.  You can roll sticks up in the cloth (the same way you use sticks to wind the warp).  You can use pieces of paper towel folded into hard triangles to tighten up a selvedge (this will not work on very slick threads).  Hope this gives you some ideas.

Posted on Fri, 04/03/2020 - 20:01

<p>If sections of the warp sag, that is typically an uneven warp tension problem. If one side is looser than the other, it&#39;s the same situation. You probably want to unweave and rebeam to correct.</p><p>If the warp tension is consistent, but one side of the weaving line (&quot;fell&quot;) is growing taller than the other, you could be placing the weft unevenly without realizing it. An example of this might be using just a single hand on the RH, and not actually grabbing the RH in the center consistently when placing each weft. The wider the loom, the greater chance you could be off just a bit pick after pick, with the result that the wefts accumulate on one side after several inches because they are packed in slightly less dense than the other side. A better bet is to use both hands, evenly spaced along the RH, when placing the weft.</p>

Posted on Mon, 04/13/2020 - 20:30

<p>Thanks for your reply, Sally. I personally use both hands on the RH and I don&rsquo;t think that&rsquo;s my issue. However, it just occurred to me it could be a&nbsp;winding on issue. Could I possibly not be&nbsp;maintaining a consistent tension as I&rsquo;m winding the warp onto the back beam before I thread and tie on the front? &nbsp;Could the one side become loosened as I weave and advance the warp because it isn&rsquo;t packed tight consistently across the width?</p>

Posted on Mon, 04/13/2020 - 23:49

Winding on with uneven tension could be the cause.  I had a warp that gave me fits, and when I looked at my trapeze from the front of the loom, I realized that the loom has been leveled and squared (the floor is not level), but the trapeze (a roller suspended from the ceiling) was not level.  One side was lower and closer to the loom than the other.