Hello!

Hello Rayon Chenille weavers!    Hope everyone with an interest in this fiber will post their hopes, dreams, success, failures and frustrations so we can all learn a bit more about how to work with this tempermental fiber!   I have a chenille warp on one loom now, doing a very simple 8 shaft tied weave.....coming out wonderfully!  What are all of you weaving?

Comments

Posted on Thu, 06/18/2009 - 20:25

HI everyone!  Please tell us about your experiences with Rayon cheinlle.  I am working on some scarves right now.....a simple 8 shaft Single Two Tie Unit weave with very geometric motif.  When they are complete, I'll post a picture.  What are all of you working on??

Posted on Sun, 06/21/2009 - 14:34

HI Kalama....and welcome to the group.......shadow weave works exceptionally well with rayon chenille and produces beautiful items!  What size chenille are you using, and what sett?  How do you plan to wet finish the item and what do you plan to do with the fringe?   Hope you'll post a pic when they are complete!

Posted on Mon, 06/22/2009 - 00:12

I want to do some narrow, long scarves.  Probably about 6" wide and enough length to wind around the throat several times.    I plan to use rayon chenille warp and weft for several and some I would like to use rayon chenille warp and a thin boucle weft (almost like sewing thread but with a bit of tooth).  I've got two weights of chenille.  Some are 1850 yd/lb and some are 1300 yd/lb.  For my first attempts (in a very long time) I will use plain weave.  I plan to twist my fringes and wet finishing is an absolute necessity.

I have several questions.  Does anyone have suggested setts for my combinations above and does anyone have suggestions about length for a skinny scarf?  Also, I would very much like to dry these in the dryer -- would you finish the twisted fringe first or is there some other way to stabilize until after it is wet finished?

These are to be casual scarves -- for the young and the young at heart.

Posted on Mon, 06/22/2009 - 13:15

HI Beryl.....1850 and 1300 ypp chenille both have about the same size core yarn, so I would sett them identically.  For plain weave that will NOT worm, I suggest 16-18 epi.  I might suggest 20 epi if you were weaving something wider, but for such a narrow piece, a sett of 16-18 epi should suffice.  The narrow scarves I see the young women wearing are about 3" wide, maybe four, so your 6" start will probably yield something quite satisfactory.  You will have to be careful to keep the tension as even as possible for the entire length of the scarf or you might see some adverse things happening after a wash or two.

Rayon chenille *should* be dried in the dryer, as it requires LOW heat and agitation to allow the rayon to retract to its starting length.  Definitely finish the fringes prior to any wet finishing of the items.  I know a lot of people thing weaving in filler and washing the fringes unfinished works, and it may appear to do so initially, but it allows the core yarns to unply a bit and destablizes the pile and shedding pile will result, even sometimes when the fringes are plyed afterward. 

 

Posted on Mon, 06/22/2009 - 17:13

Thanks, Su for all the great advice.  I wouldn't have realized that the sett would be the same for the two weights of chenille.  I'm so glad you addressed the fringe finishing because I know a lot of  people who don't finish them until after the piece has been wet finished.  But I like to give my woven pieces a bit of a trial before I send them off in the world -- so stabilizing everything before washing and drying seems appropriate.

Posted on Mon, 06/29/2009 - 13:06

Rayon chenille dyes **beautifully** with MX dyes.  It really comes out bright and fully saturated with color!  Be cautious about handling the chenille when wet, as it is very weak when wet.  Lift skeins from underneath and do NOT hang them to dry....lay them flat.  Most chenille will crinkle up when wetted, but if you just leave it alone it will also retract back to it's normal state when dry.....it may *look* wrinkled, but it will behave well in the warp and weft and become sumptuous and soft again after being woven and wet finished. 

Posted on Sun, 07/05/2009 - 23:03

HI Everyone!  I see we are 31 strong now!  Please introduce yourself and tell us about how you are using rayon chenille.....problems, successes, questions etc! 

I am still working on my warp of scarves in Single Two-tie unit weave.  They are coming out beautifully and I hope to have the warp done in a week or so.  I am going to play a little with some other structures after I return from the MAFA conference, where I am teaching Color......so armed with fresh color info, I'll play with some creative ways to coax color blends out of chenille yarns! 

What are you all working on??

 

Posted on Sun, 07/12/2009 - 22:40

I finished up two plain weave narrow scarves.  (see the above post in which I asked for advice).  They turned out well.  My only problem was the twisted fringe seemed to worm a bit after washing and drying.  I pulled on each fringe and it settled down.  Maybe I should have done this before they went into the dryer?

As soon as I have the beads added to the fringe, I'll take a picture and post it.  I did post the details on my project page.

I like the 5" finished width.  They could have probably been a bit narrower and a bit longer -- so maybe I'll cut an inch off the width of the next warp and make the warp length 6 1/2 yds.

Oh - I forgot to mention that there are little beard ends below the knots in the twisted fringe.  This is where the chenille shed after the wet finishing.  What about a hem finish for the next ones.  Any suggestions on doing a neat one that isn't too bulky?

Posted on Sun, 07/12/2009 - 23:58

Hi Beryl,

I've heard of a finish that may do the trick.  You weave a band of plain weave long enough to turn under as a selvedge - about 2 inches, then you leave double the fringe length you want unwoven.  Now you weave the scarf as ususal and repeat the process at the other end.  When you cut off leave the inch or two of plain weave attached to the fringe and turn it up and stitch it to the main body of the scarf.  You will have a fringe with no cut ends and when you twizzle  or braid it is very stable, no worming, no fraying.   I have also heard that braiding the fringe is more stable than twizzling.

Cheers

Lynnette

Posted on Mon, 07/13/2009 - 03:23

Thanks, Lynette.  This sounds like a really cool finish and I'll give it a try for my next scarves.  The braiding tip sounds good too because I'm really not fond of the twisted fringes on the last scarves I wove.

Posted on Mon, 07/13/2009 - 13:45

HI Beryl and Lynette.......

Beryl - glad your scarves turned out well.  Fringes on Chenille items are a bit of a trick.....traditional methods must be modified to make them work well with chenille and to stabalize the pile.  Fringes need to be twisted to achieve 8-10 twists per inch if possible.  That is far tighter than usually required of other, more stable yarns.  Then, and this is key, the reverse twist MUST be counted to be the same number of twists as the original.......this will seem like overtwisting when you are actually doing it, and one the knot is tied the ply may untwist a bit, but this is the means to creating a fringe that will not worm.  If the fringe worms then the number of twist is not high enough or the number of reverse twists was not attended to.   The little beards at the end of the fringes are a problem.  In my book, there is a bit of a chapter on a method I developed to twist fringes so there is NO raw end....the fringes are plied upon themselves and knotted at the fell line of the cloth with the raw end cut away for a perfectly finished fringe.  These fringes are very stable, but require careful counting just as any plied chenille fringe does.  Braiding is also an excellent finish, but if you braind you have the beards that lose pile.   Lynette's method of fringing is excellent for many fibers, but I have not had success with it when weaving with chenille.  If you ply the doubled fringes and knot them, it does keep the pile intact, but the finges end up bulky in my experience.  Lynette, perhaps you can tell us how you actually ply the fringes and what method you use to keep them secure without creating a lot of bulk??

Blatant plug - my book, Understanding Rayon Chenille, is once again available as a book on CD. Anyone wishing to know more can visit my website at www.subudesigns.com or write to me privately.

Posted on Mon, 07/20/2009 - 16:42

Hi ---My name is Gloria and I have been weaving with chenille about 3 years and having a great time with color blending.  As for finishing, I have been throwing 3 picks of sewing thread at the beginning and end of a scarf, weave the fringe with scrap yarn then zig-zag over the thread picks with a sewing machine before wet finishing.  After wet finishing, I unravel the scrap yarn and it leaves a bit of a bumpy fringe. Its an easy finish and looks good.

Posted on Wed, 07/22/2009 - 16:05

HI Gloria.....welcome to the group!   You are smart to use the sewing thread at the beginning and end of the scarf.  It helps protect the weft and keep in in place.  I must admit I am dismayed at the method used for your fringes.  While the bumpy fringes may look great when you first undo them, subsequent laundering and just general use and wear will quickly strip the pile from the fringes and you (or worse!!...your customer) will be left with a bunch of ugly string hanging from the ends of their scarf.  Rayon chenille fringes need to be finished - plying, braiding etc, to keep the pile in the yarn intact. 

Su :-)

Posted on Wed, 07/29/2009 - 23:01

Hello,

 

I have been weaving chenille scarves for quite awhile and have even given a little program at our guild about  finishing.  Just like Sue recommends, I never let the twist turn on itself.  I always twist to the right about 8 turns per inch and then to the left the same amount of twists.   It has worked wonderfully for me and one of my scarves that I woven with Cotton Cloud chenille is now 10 years old and the fringe is in perfect shape.   I leave about 6 inches for fringe.   I visited a beautiful craft shop in N.H. this summer, the price on the shawl was $200. and the fringe was only one inch untwisted.   I felt like telling them that this shawl is giving a bad reputation to chenille weaving but kept quiet.   Hope to learn alot from this group.   By the way I love to set my 1450 at 16epi.

Stephanie

 

Posted on Wed, 07/29/2009 - 23:34

Hello to the group.

I have been weaving for about 30 years and have woven chenille for about 10 years.  Ten years ago I wove chenille scarves for a designer I knew.  That year I did about 300 yards of chenille scarves...mostly in stripes with 20/2 pearl cotton weft. 

I have explored chenille on my own since then and have been trying to get a jacket weight fabric that is not quite so liquid looking as the scarves.

Deanna

Posted on Thu, 07/30/2009 - 00:05

A friend of mine gave me about 4 spools of left over chenille yarn but not brave enough to try on my 4 harnest loom.  There's enough to make 4 scarves.  I almost forgotten I had it.  I also own a "Knitter's" Loom that you can weave up yarns that's kind of soft and suitable for crocheting or knitting.  Ashford created these looms and you can add multiple harnests (like two at a time) to create more WPI's.  I was thinking about using this chenille on my Ashford Knitters Loom.  I thought my 4 harnest table loom will add too much tension on chenille yarn, but I think the same friend that gave me this yarn had used it on her 10 Harnest Floor Loom with no problem.

I also tried weaving chenille (but the Lion Brand's chenille yarn) on one of my Weavette Looms, but when I was close to finishing weaving the square, I darn near stripped the chenille off the base of the yarn.  Luckly I had just a few inches left.  I'm at the process of weaving 16 squares for each side of pillow, but I still have a long ways to go.  Last time I will weave chenille yarn on my Weavette Looms.  I will stick with using my Ashford Knitter's Loom.  Not so rough on the chenille yarn.

Cookie

Posted on Tue, 08/04/2009 - 17:44

Hi Cookie.......do not be afraid to use your chenille on the 4 harness loom.  If you handle it carefully and gently, it can certainly withstand being woven!  I have woven literally thousands of rayon cheinlle items!  It you are very uncomfortable, try using a warp of Tencel, silk, or rayon and use the chenille in the weft.  If you do choose to use the chenille as the warp, be sure to sett the warp appropriately for the weave structure you want to use.  I am not sure what size chenille you have been gifted with, but if it runs 1200-1900 yards per pound, then sett at 18-20 epi for a good, firm plain weave.  The piece will feel stiff after removing from the loom, but will get soft and luxurious after wet finishing. 

I can understand the pile stripping out of the yarn when doing the last squares of a Weavette......the pile is only held in place by the twist of the core yarn, so any overmanipulation will cause the pile to shed. 

Hope that helps!

Su :-)

 

 

Posted on Tue, 08/04/2009 - 17:47

HI Deanna......if you wish to weave a jacket weight fabric, try using a mixed warp/weft that includes the chenille.  You could use perle cotton if that is your yarn of choice, in a finer weight than the 20/2 (maybe 30/2) and intersperse the chenille so you get the pile where you wish, creating a firmer fabric for a jacket.  You could change the weave structure in addition to choosing to mix materials to create a nice jacket weight.  I very often use a silk warp and chenille weft for garment weight fabrics that retain that sheen and luxurious feel of chenille but that have more body than an all rayon item.

Su :-)

Posted on Tue, 08/04/2009 - 17:52

HI Stephanie.......I had to laugh when I read about the shawl you saw.....telling the proprietors is usually an exercise in futility, as they don't see what happens to the fringes in the end.....but if you focus on the unsatisfied customer that is likely to result from a sale of this item, they might just listen and ask their supplier to do something with the fringes.   I have been know to have such conversations with vendors......<gg>

I'm glad to hear you are passing on the advice to twist fringes well, and evenly.  It makes all the difference in the world, particularly when the item is woven of yarns that are 100% viscose rayon. 

16 epi is a decent sett for 1450 ypp rayon chenille as long as the weave structure is plain weave.  It is the very least number of epi that I would use for any rayon chenille with a core the equivalent of an 8/2 cotton........

Su :-)

 

Posted on Thu, 09/10/2009 - 00:00

Su,

I still have problem imagining how the folded fringes are secured!  Can you post a picture of fringes finished that way?  Thank you.

I haven't worked with chenille in a while but will start again very soon.

Maryse

Posted on Thu, 09/10/2009 - 11:44

HI Maryse.....here is a photo of a piece done with my fringe technique.....

Note how the knot is at the fell line stead of the end of the fringe, and there is NO little beard!

Note how the knot is at the fell line and there is no little beard on the fringe.  The ends are completely finished. The fringes are very secure when done using this method.

Best,

Su :-)

Posted on Thu, 09/10/2009 - 13:25

Here is my first piece woven with rayon chenille yarn. Weft is chenille yarn 41% acrylic/59% viscose. The warp is flat ribbon yarn 94% viscose. This was woven on a backstrap loom. Construction details on my blog.

http://francosfiberadventure.blogspot.com/2009/09/acrylicchenille-scarf-...

At first I beat the chenille firmly and found the scarf was as stiff as a carpet. So I loosened up the the weave by pulling it back up the warp and putting it back down the warp with a comb. Then I started weaving again from that point and did not beat it so hard. Much better feel. Kind of a balancing act between beating for a firm weave and having a loose weave/drape by placing the weft, not beating.

At the end of the weaving, I hem stitch both ends of the weaving with the chenille weft. I tied the warps close to the weft with overhand knot (groups of 3) and I tied overhand knot each individual warp 1/4 inch from the end for fringe. Finished weaving length is 51 inch chenille woven plus 12 inch fringe on each end. I used one of those big balls of chenille and 91 feet of ribbon yarn. It took about 3 days maybe 6 hours altogether.

I am finding that the knots I tied to add in the weft are very lumpy. Is there a better way to add weft that wont leave loose ends hanging out? I normally overlap weft changes on my weaving but this is so loose I was worried about loose ends working our.

Have a good day!

Posted on Thu, 09/10/2009 - 13:59

Whoa!   That's beautiful!  I better read the instruction again and practice and practice....  If only I could have a demonstration :-) 

Thanks Su.

Maryse

Posted on Thu, 09/10/2009 - 17:20

Next time I see you in person, I'll gladly show you how this is done......I'll be at Complex Weavers Seminars in ABQ in 2010....probably won't meet before then......but who knows?? <g>

Su :-)

Posted on Thu, 09/10/2009 - 17:31

HI Francorios.......Since you used chenille that has a synthetic content, you won't have to worry to much about worming.  However, chenille of all fiber types tends to feel pretty heavy and stiff when woven.  Did you wet finish your piece after weaving??  If the piece is ever going to be laundered, it is important to finish with a good wet finish after the piece comes off the loom.  Even though chenille tends to feel heavy and stiff when woven, after wet finishing it will feel much softer and have a more pliable hand.  When you weave chenille, a wet finish will show whether the beat/sett were good enough to prevent worming.  I cannot tell the scale of your piece and so cannot tell if it is intended ot be a scarf or a belt or something else.  If it is going to be worn, the looser beat on the chenille may come back to haunt you.....I hope it does not, but it is possible - especially with the viscose warp and very open sett.   

Hemstitching with chenille yarn does very little to secure the yarns......remember that chenille is only as strong as the core yarn.....the pile does nothing to secure other yarns into a weave structure.   I think it is better to weave two shots of sewing thread and beat firmly at the beginning and ending of a chenille piece to protect the weft.  But this might not really work with the warp you chose. 

Weft can be tied together by stripping the pile from 2" of chenille, stripping 2" from the piece to be joined, tying a very small, tight knot and trimming the ends off....the knot should be practically invisible and should not feel very prominent if you handle it that way.

I want to congratulate you on your first chenille piece!!  I am sure you will enjoy it and hope you keep on weaving with chenille!

Su :-)

Posted on Thu, 09/10/2009 - 18:46

Thank you Su,

I've never played with chenille before and this is exactly what I need to hear.

So before I wet finish this, I will do the weft joins agains the way you described.

I will do the hemstitch over with some of the ribbon yarn I used as warp and I can still weave a few shots in the end of the weave at both ends.

The piece is 3 inch wide woven, 51 inch long woven, with 12 inch fringe. Its a scarf.

I have three more balls of chenille to play with.

Thank you again!

Have a good day!

 

Posted on Mon, 11/09/2009 - 19:53

Hi!  I have been weaving for about 6 or 7 years, and have woven most every fiber, but I've never before attempted weaving rayon chenille.  I've just ordered several cones on chenille in the most beautiful fall colors.  The chenille is about 1800 yards per pound, and what I'd like to do is use the different colors of chenille to create stripes in the warp and black tencel or perle cotton for the weft with some kind of a twill pattern.  My question is, what sett should I use for the warp, and what weight should I use for the weft to make the pattern pronounced?  I've got all weights of black perle cotton and 8/2 and 20/2 black tencel on hand.

Thanks,

Cindy

Posted on Mon, 11/09/2009 - 22:50

HI Cindy.....welcome to the group!   If your warp is going to be all chenille, and woven in a twill, I would suggest 20-24 epi........I would sett at 24 personally.  If you are going to do anything but a straight 2/2 twill, you will need to weave a supplementary binding pick - in other words, a shot of tabby - in between every pattern pick.  A very fine thread can be used for this and it will disappear into the weave, but if you don't do it, your chenille will probably worm.  You could use your 20/2 black tencel, but it is a little thick to act as a supplementary binding pick.  I would opt for a black rayon sewing thread.  If you use the 8/2 for the pattern and the sewing thread for the SBP, you will only need two shuttles and weaving should go fast.   If you plan to use any other twill, sett closer and use the SBP and don't make your floats any more than three threads long.......

Happy weaving!

Su :-).........if you don't have my book, Understanding Rayon Chenille, you might want to buy or borrow a copy to learn about how to handle chenille.  Perhaps your local guild or library has a copy, and if not, I have copies (on CD only) for sale......

 

Posted on Tue, 11/17/2009 - 17:15

Sue,

I received your book (I'm the Cindy who contacted you about having trouble registering.) and have read it from cover to cover and realized my plans for my first project were a little ambitious and I better try something more basic for my first attempt.

I warp F2B and I loved your suggestions for warping the chenille using the dowels!  I can see where this method would be great for other fibers as well, and I'm excited to try it.

I do have one question.  When planning out the length of the warp, I was wondering if I can include the length tied to both the front and back as part of the fringe, or if the knots damage the chenille too much to use this.

Thanks!

Cindy

Posted on Tue, 11/17/2009 - 20:18

HI Cindy......glad you got the book registered.......and my goodness, you must be a speed reader!  

The dowels work exceptionally well for winding a chenille warp that must not be fussed with while beaming.  They allow an nice even tension and little fuss. 

Yes, you can use your waste yarns as fringes.  I would not, however, attempt to untie knots, rather allow enough to knot and then cut off the knots and use the rest as fringes.  You will have to waste a little, but rayon chenille can be a bear to knot, and even if you are successful, it usually ends up in loss of pile from the knotted areas of the yarn.  When I tie onto the front apron, I use a surgeons knot to hold the yarn in place, (two half knots, like the first part of tying a shoe), then tie a bow in the warp to hold it.  When I am done, I can untie these threads and use the entire length as fringe.  It is a real yarn saver. 

Happy chenille weaving Cindy!   Let me know if you have any further questions!

Best,

Su :-)

Posted on Thu, 06/18/2009 - 20:25

HI everyone!  Please tell us about your experiences with Rayon cheinlle.  I am working on some scarves right now.....a simple 8 shaft Single Two Tie Unit weave with very geometric motif.  When they are complete, I'll post a picture.  What are all of you working on??

Posted on Sun, 06/21/2009 - 14:34

HI Kalama....and welcome to the group.......shadow weave works exceptionally well with rayon chenille and produces beautiful items!  What size chenille are you using, and what sett?  How do you plan to wet finish the item and what do you plan to do with the fringe?   Hope you'll post a pic when they are complete!

Posted on Mon, 06/22/2009 - 00:12

I want to do some narrow, long scarves.  Probably about 6" wide and enough length to wind around the throat several times.    I plan to use rayon chenille warp and weft for several and some I would like to use rayon chenille warp and a thin boucle weft (almost like sewing thread but with a bit of tooth).  I've got two weights of chenille.  Some are 1850 yd/lb and some are 1300 yd/lb.  For my first attempts (in a very long time) I will use plain weave.  I plan to twist my fringes and wet finishing is an absolute necessity.

I have several questions.  Does anyone have suggested setts for my combinations above and does anyone have suggestions about length for a skinny scarf?  Also, I would very much like to dry these in the dryer -- would you finish the twisted fringe first or is there some other way to stabilize until after it is wet finished?

These are to be casual scarves -- for the young and the young at heart.

Posted on Mon, 06/22/2009 - 13:15

HI Beryl.....1850 and 1300 ypp chenille both have about the same size core yarn, so I would sett them identically.  For plain weave that will NOT worm, I suggest 16-18 epi.  I might suggest 20 epi if you were weaving something wider, but for such a narrow piece, a sett of 16-18 epi should suffice.  The narrow scarves I see the young women wearing are about 3" wide, maybe four, so your 6" start will probably yield something quite satisfactory.  You will have to be careful to keep the tension as even as possible for the entire length of the scarf or you might see some adverse things happening after a wash or two.

Rayon chenille *should* be dried in the dryer, as it requires LOW heat and agitation to allow the rayon to retract to its starting length.  Definitely finish the fringes prior to any wet finishing of the items.  I know a lot of people thing weaving in filler and washing the fringes unfinished works, and it may appear to do so initially, but it allows the core yarns to unply a bit and destablizes the pile and shedding pile will result, even sometimes when the fringes are plyed afterward. 

 

Posted on Mon, 06/22/2009 - 17:13

Thanks, Su for all the great advice.  I wouldn't have realized that the sett would be the same for the two weights of chenille.  I'm so glad you addressed the fringe finishing because I know a lot of  people who don't finish them until after the piece has been wet finished.  But I like to give my woven pieces a bit of a trial before I send them off in the world -- so stabilizing everything before washing and drying seems appropriate.

Posted on Mon, 06/29/2009 - 13:06

Rayon chenille dyes **beautifully** with MX dyes.  It really comes out bright and fully saturated with color!  Be cautious about handling the chenille when wet, as it is very weak when wet.  Lift skeins from underneath and do NOT hang them to dry....lay them flat.  Most chenille will crinkle up when wetted, but if you just leave it alone it will also retract back to it's normal state when dry.....it may *look* wrinkled, but it will behave well in the warp and weft and become sumptuous and soft again after being woven and wet finished. 

Posted on Sun, 07/05/2009 - 23:03

HI Everyone!  I see we are 31 strong now!  Please introduce yourself and tell us about how you are using rayon chenille.....problems, successes, questions etc! 

I am still working on my warp of scarves in Single Two-tie unit weave.  They are coming out beautifully and I hope to have the warp done in a week or so.  I am going to play a little with some other structures after I return from the MAFA conference, where I am teaching Color......so armed with fresh color info, I'll play with some creative ways to coax color blends out of chenille yarns! 

What are you all working on??

 

Posted on Sun, 07/12/2009 - 22:40

I finished up two plain weave narrow scarves.  (see the above post in which I asked for advice).  They turned out well.  My only problem was the twisted fringe seemed to worm a bit after washing and drying.  I pulled on each fringe and it settled down.  Maybe I should have done this before they went into the dryer?

As soon as I have the beads added to the fringe, I'll take a picture and post it.  I did post the details on my project page.

I like the 5" finished width.  They could have probably been a bit narrower and a bit longer -- so maybe I'll cut an inch off the width of the next warp and make the warp length 6 1/2 yds.

Oh - I forgot to mention that there are little beard ends below the knots in the twisted fringe.  This is where the chenille shed after the wet finishing.  What about a hem finish for the next ones.  Any suggestions on doing a neat one that isn't too bulky?

Posted on Sun, 07/12/2009 - 23:58

Hi Beryl,

I've heard of a finish that may do the trick.  You weave a band of plain weave long enough to turn under as a selvedge - about 2 inches, then you leave double the fringe length you want unwoven.  Now you weave the scarf as ususal and repeat the process at the other end.  When you cut off leave the inch or two of plain weave attached to the fringe and turn it up and stitch it to the main body of the scarf.  You will have a fringe with no cut ends and when you twizzle  or braid it is very stable, no worming, no fraying.   I have also heard that braiding the fringe is more stable than twizzling.

Cheers

Lynnette

Posted on Mon, 07/13/2009 - 03:23

Thanks, Lynette.  This sounds like a really cool finish and I'll give it a try for my next scarves.  The braiding tip sounds good too because I'm really not fond of the twisted fringes on the last scarves I wove.

Posted on Mon, 07/13/2009 - 13:45

HI Beryl and Lynette.......

Beryl - glad your scarves turned out well.  Fringes on Chenille items are a bit of a trick.....traditional methods must be modified to make them work well with chenille and to stabalize the pile.  Fringes need to be twisted to achieve 8-10 twists per inch if possible.  That is far tighter than usually required of other, more stable yarns.  Then, and this is key, the reverse twist MUST be counted to be the same number of twists as the original.......this will seem like overtwisting when you are actually doing it, and one the knot is tied the ply may untwist a bit, but this is the means to creating a fringe that will not worm.  If the fringe worms then the number of twist is not high enough or the number of reverse twists was not attended to.   The little beards at the end of the fringes are a problem.  In my book, there is a bit of a chapter on a method I developed to twist fringes so there is NO raw end....the fringes are plied upon themselves and knotted at the fell line of the cloth with the raw end cut away for a perfectly finished fringe.  These fringes are very stable, but require careful counting just as any plied chenille fringe does.  Braiding is also an excellent finish, but if you braind you have the beards that lose pile.   Lynette's method of fringing is excellent for many fibers, but I have not had success with it when weaving with chenille.  If you ply the doubled fringes and knot them, it does keep the pile intact, but the finges end up bulky in my experience.  Lynette, perhaps you can tell us how you actually ply the fringes and what method you use to keep them secure without creating a lot of bulk??

Blatant plug - my book, Understanding Rayon Chenille, is once again available as a book on CD. Anyone wishing to know more can visit my website at www.subudesigns.com or write to me privately.

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