Need reed advice

  Last night I spent hours winding a very long warp for 10 tea towels.   The sett will be 20epi, and the pattern calls for 2 ends per dent in a 10 reed except for the last 2 dents, which should be 3 per dent.  

 I completely zoned out on the fact that my 10 reed is not wide enough for this warp!    All I have left is a 6 reed.  I would have to load it 3-3-4, will that be ok?  Or should I just suck it up and order a new reed?   Since these will be Christmas gifts, I hate the thought of waiting for a new reed to arrive, but would hate it even more if I ruined the project.   

The warp is 8/2 cottolin if that matters at all.

Thanks in advance,

Deb in N TX 

Comments

Posted on Wed, 12/01/2010 - 17:57

You can go ahead and do a compound sleying as you suggest.  Just be consistent in your sleying in case the reed marks don't completely disappear in the wet finishing.  That way it will look like it was done on purpose (as it was!)  :)

Cheers,

Laura

Posted on Thu, 12/02/2010 - 14:15

So, does this mean that if my loom is 36" wide, if I were weaving a narrower project, I could use a narrower reed?

Just now, I have the 12 dent and 5 dent reeds that came with my loom, but I'm asking just in case I "find" another one.

Posted on Thu, 12/02/2010 - 17:49

Absolutely!

In fact, in some older Swedish weaving books it is said that one should never use a reed wider than the actual warp... The reason remains a mystery, though. (The only possible reason we have been able to think up in our guild is that *perhaps* dents could be bent at the selvages, and one would not want bent dents that could cause bigger reed marks...)

Posted on Thu, 12/02/2010 - 20:08

Using narrower reeds is fine.  You can also use longer ones if they will fit in your loom.  Some looms are 'open' so longer reeds fit fine.  Others are 'closed' so you have to use a reed no longer than your loom will allow in that case.

Cheers,

Laura

Posted on Mon, 01/03/2011 - 02:41

I have newbie question on this subject. Is it most desirable to have a situation where you have one end per dent? Or are there certain benefits to have multiple ends per dent (other than not having to have many many reeds on hand)? We used a 10 dent per inch reed that came with our used loom for the projects we have done so far that were either 20 or 15 epi but I have often wondered if there is any benefit to having a reed match your threading exactly so there would be one end per dent. Thanks!

mike in MD 

Posted on Mon, 01/03/2011 - 04:08

If your reed gets too 'fine' i.e. more than about 15-20 dents per inch it gets really hard to sley.  The finest reed I have is 20 and I've never used it.  If I want 40 epi I'll do 4 per dent in a 10 dent reed.

Cheers,

Laura

Posted on Mon, 01/03/2011 - 15:47

While we are talking about reeds, I have a question.  I am about to buy a reed for my 60' glimakra standard.  I want to make rugs now and fine linen later.  Is there a size that would work well for both, so I don't have to buy two reeds?  Would I be better off to buy a 6 dent for the rug weaving and a 10 for the linen?

Aunt Janet

Posted on Mon, 01/03/2011 - 15:59

I'd get both.  If you are going to be weaving finer fabrics the 10 would be more useful than the 6, I think.  Or you could look around for used reeds before investing in new ones all at once.

I have reeds from 4/dent through to 20/dent.  The latter has never been used as I find it too fine to see properly to sley.  I have used my 15 quite a lot for epi's of 30, 45, and 60.

Cheers,

Laura

Posted on Mon, 01/03/2011 - 16:36

As a newbie weaver, I referenced the Debbie Chandler Learning to Weave "reed and sett chart."

My loom came with a 12 dent, and looking at all the other setts, I circled the reeds that in combination with my 12, gave me almost all possible setts. To my amazement, I realized I needed to purchase only two other reeds. (a 6 or 8 and a 10, I think.) For the longest time, I only had three reeds for each loom type. (3 for the floor, 3 for the table looms.)

I also have a finer reed for each of my looms, either a 15 or 20. (I actually use my 20 from time to time, for 20/2 cotton, or 50/2 silk once.)

If you belong to a guild, eventually someone seems to give away a 15 or up, because not too many weavers favor the finer threads. As Laura pointed out, the larger dent reeds are definitely more versatile!

Posted on Mon, 01/03/2011 - 23:00

My goodness, it never occured to me to put my 16" reeds in my 36" loom when I am working on a smaller project! Fantastic idea. Thanks, Suzy

Posted on Mon, 01/03/2011 - 23:00

My goodness, it never occured to me to put my 16" reeds in my 36" loom when I am working on a smaller project! Fantastic idea. Thanks, Suzy

Posted on Tue, 08/21/2012 - 17:31

Hi, new to the forum as you know.  Wondering if you have a suggestion for threading the reed.  I am going to weave 1450ypp chenille at 15-16epi. Can you suggest the best formula for a 6 dent reed?  Its the only reed I own.  But, that said, I'm warping for two 28" shawls and if you think it best that I get a 15 dent reed, then I will.  Thanks so much.  Kit, Durango Colorado

After many years of teaching, I am retired and now have the time to weave, spin, make baskets, silversmith, and knit again.

Posted on Tue, 08/21/2012 - 19:36

This is not an answer to the above question. But, I will be weaving 16 epi soon, I am threading the heddles now. I can make reeds, but the SS I need is hard to source in small quantities, so I am just going to buy a Leclerc 16 dent reed, as I live in Canada. My loom is 62" wide on the inside, but I weave around 60". I'll probably get the full width since you never know I may do some table cloth. Plus I am going to be weaving some wool fabric from single ply, tartan scarfs and garments.

Just my random thoughts. :)

Posted on Tue, 08/21/2012 - 20:21

Photokit,

Is this your first time weaving with chenille? I found that I preferred a tighter sett than typically recommended for this particular material, like 16-18 epi. for 1,450 yyp rayon chenille. Especially if your structure has floats in it (i.e. not plain weave.) In that case, you could easily dent 3 per slot in your 6 dent for 18 epi.

Otherwise, you are stuck with 2,3 alternating in your 6 dent reed for 15 epi or 3,3,2,3,3,2 for 16 epi.

No, I wouldn't buy a 15 for this particular application. The yarn is going to be less abrading on itself than the metal edges of a dent. So you are better off with this soft material rubbing against itself instead of metal.

A final note. When woven properly, chenille will feel somewhat stiff when it comes off the loom. Finished appropriately, it has a great, rich drape. So don't be afraid to sett this material on the tighter side. If it is fairly drapey when it comes right off the loom, it may look great at first, but the yarn may begin to worm (twist up into slubby bits) on you before you even get a chance to enjoy wearing your scarf. Sampling would be a good idea if you can.

Posted on Tue, 08/21/2012 - 21:21

I use 20 epi for this size of rayon chenille when my threading is a twill with no points. The sett is determined by the yarn and the interlacement, how many times the weft goes over and under per repeat. When you see a recommendation for twill, it assumes a straight 4-shaft twill, and the sett will be the same for a network drafted twill or twill blocks based on 4-shaft twills. If you have a point threading, there are fewer interlacements and longer floats so it needs a closer sett.

Keep your floats under a quarter of an inch to avoid worming.

I prefer to have 2 threads per dent usually but use 3 or 4 per dent fairly often if needed. Your 6-dent reed is all right for rugs and for presleying in the Scandinavian warping style. For scarves and linens and such, 10 or 12-dent reeds are very handy.

Bonnie

Posted on Wed, 08/22/2012 - 01:41

Hi, this is about my 3rd try with chenille.  The first time the sett was too loose and after washing it "wormed" I still wore it.  The second try I really like the hand of it but I want something a bit stronger.  I think I wove the second scarf at 12epi at around 10rows per inch.  I'm just getting back into weaving after a few years hiatus so I'm thinking I'm ready for a shawl and dressing the loom for it.  I think I'll follow the advice to sett at 16 or 18epi.  What do you like for the weft count on the 16/18 epi?

 

After many years of teaching, I am retired and now have the time to weave, spin, make baskets, silversmith, and knit again.

Posted on Wed, 08/22/2012 - 01:42

I like how the plain weave drapes.

 

After many years of teaching, I am retired and now have the time to weave, spin, make baskets, silversmith, and knit again.

Posted on Wed, 08/22/2012 - 20:34

Laura, Can you explain wet finishing :)

 

After many years of teaching, I am retired and now have the time to weave, spin, make baskets, silversmith, and knit again.

Posted on Wed, 08/22/2012 - 21:52

Wet finishing refers to the very first time your woven cloth encounters water.  The process of wet finishing can be quite severe in some regards and perhaps even much more severe than instructions for washing the item.

For example, rayon chenille I wet finish in the washing machine on warm water wash/rinse cycle, then dry in the dryer until dry, removing as soon as the cloth is completely dry.  Care instructions on the scarf reads "Hand wash warm water, hand to dry or on low heat in dryer".

For cotton, I use the hottest water available but care instructions are to use warm water.

For wool, if I want to full the cloth I may use hot water and agitate vigorously in the washing machine but care instructions will read "Wash by hand, lay flat to dry"

Wet finishing brings the woven web to it's *finished* state.  Washing instructions will be how to clean the item from then on.

For anyone interested Magic in the Water; wet finishing handwovens is now available as a pdf file.  My latest publication includes wet finishing instructions for the samples that illustrate A Good Yarn: Cotton.

PM me for details or visit my website for Magic; my Art Fire store for A Good Yarn.

cheers,

Laura

http://laurafry.com

http://laurafry.artfire.com

Posted on Thu, 08/23/2012 - 05:14

I think 16 epi should do for a balanced plain weave with this weight of rayon chenille. I haven't woven chenille in plain weave for 20-some years but 16 sounds about right for plain weave. I wouldn't use anything less than 16, and would consider 18. People sometimes use 20 epi for plain weave with a fine weft, in which case it might weave at more than 20 ppi.

Bonnie

Posted on Thu, 08/23/2012 - 21:01

I have a favorite Pashmina shawl.  It measures 28x80"  How do you like that measurement for a chenille shawl.  The "hand" of the pashmina is much lighter, softer, than I imagine the chenille will fall.  How about some feedback for the size of a chenille shawl?

After many years of teaching, I am retired and now have the time to weave, spin, make baskets, silversmith, and knit again.

Posted on Thu, 08/23/2012 - 21:01

I have a favorite Pashmina shawl.  It measures 28x80"  How do you like that measurement for a chenille shawl.  The "hand" of the pashmina is much lighter, softer, than I imagine the chenille will fall.  How about some feedback for the size of a chenille shawl?

After many years of teaching, I am retired and now have the time to weave, spin, make baskets, silversmith, and knit again.

Posted on Fri, 08/24/2012 - 21:03

Is it possible  to use a shorter (10") reed in a 16" loom? If so,

how can the reed be extended to fit in the wider loom?

Posted on Fri, 08/24/2012 - 21:10

Depends on the loom.  Most looms will take a shorter reed without any modification.  But some looms will not take a longer reed.

cheers,

Laura

Posted on Sat, 08/25/2012 - 09:55

In older Swedish weaving literature it is said that one should never use a reed wider than the cloth woven at the moment. The reason is not stated. Most Swe weavers I know ignore that "rule", and we have never had a problem with a wider reed - . 

Posted on Sat, 08/25/2012 - 16:38

There is no problem with using a 36" reed in a 40" loom.

One of my looms has a 60" weaving width and a fly shuttle. When I want to use the fly shuttle, I use a 60" reed. The rapidly moving shuttle doesn't like a gap between the shuttle box and the reed.

Bonnie