Make a Macomber loom better

Erick at Macomber wants to know what changes would you like to see to improve the Macomber looms. This is your chance to tell the company that you like and don't like about your Macomber loom and what you would do to make it better.

Michael

Comments

Posted on Thu, 08/02/2012 - 16:47

Some counterweights on the shafts to make the treadling lighter.  Macomber is notorious for producing "Thews of steel" (not a bad idea but more difficult as we age).

Laurie

Posted on Fri, 08/03/2012 - 13:51

I can't tell you how much I love this question.

I've talked to Eddie about this and he's made the adjustment when my students order looms, but with the CP, the bolt that attaches the braces to the back beam of the loom "should" be longer, mounted from the inside to the outside with a wingnut. That way, the wing nut and be easily taken to release the back for easy threading (front to back). As it is now, the bolt is screwed into the wood and each time it's unscrewed, I worry about wearing down the hole. If this doesn't make sense, Eddie should know what I'm talking about. I've also had students complain on the CPs that the clearance on the cloth beam and whatever is nearest it isn't enough and that they'd like to be able to weave more finished cloth than they can. Since this is a geometry issue, it's probably not easily fixed, but just thought I'd mention it.

I've also been thinking more about the B and that sometimes, on my 24", when my tension is really tight, the bottom harnesses rise up a little. It doesn't happen on my 40" so I'm thinking that if there was an easy way to weight the harnesses it might help.

Those are a few quick ones. I'll put some more thought into it.

Posted on Fri, 08/03/2012 - 14:09

On the Bs...I'd love an extra half inch to an inch between the frame of the loom and the brake. Sometimes, the lever that is used to tighten the brake from the front will swing back and catch between the frame and the metal rods that pull the harnesses down.

When I went back to my studio to look at my looms to see if I could come up with anything else, I was struck by how much I adore these looms and how much they have become an extension of my own body.

Posted on Fri, 08/03/2012 - 14:23

I have added a screw into the side frame to hold up the handle so that you don't have to reach all the way under the loom to grab the handle. This will also stop it from hitting the rods.

 

Michael

Posted on Wed, 08/08/2012 - 19:54

I've been thinking about this since the post came out on 8/2.  I'm hoping that they will check in here to gather the information since I don't see a link to send the comments?

I have a 12 harness, 14 treadle type B loom that I purchased new a little over a year ago.  I spent a long time looking for a replacement for my LeClerc Artistat, and believe me, there is no comparison.  I LOVE my Mac.

However, there are a couple issues that could be addressed. 

1.  I don't have a problem with the hooks for the tie-ups except for one treadle.  My #11 treadle (counting from the left) is almost directly below where the lift mechanism is riveted onto the lamm.  It is the only treadle that throws hooks...but it does throw the hooks pretty consistently while I'm weaving.  On the 4th treadle from the left, the attachment is offset from that treadle a little more, so that one does not throw hooks.

2.  The lease sticks that came with my loom are not nearly smooth enough to allow fine yarns to move over them when beaming the warp.  They should be sanded and finished to be as smooth as possible.

3.  The polyurethane finish (I think that's what they use) was still slightly soft when my loom arrived.  It never occurred to me to check that and the first warp left some thread dents in the finish on the back beam and the breast beam.  I used some very fine steel wool to smooth that out.  But it would be best to be sure the finish is hardened or cured before shipping.

Again, I love this loom.  I was concerned about the treadling effort when ordering it, but with the right height stool, it is not a problem.  I love the removeable footrest bar.  I love laying the front of the loom and removing the cloth beam to get close when threading the heddles (I warp back to front).  I love the quiet action of the loom.  I love the consistency of the tension when advancing the warp.  I haven't yet used the second warp beam (that's my next project...or maybe the one after that...) but I'm very glad that I ordered it since I plan to venture into more diversified plain weave.

 

 

Posted on Wed, 08/08/2012 - 20:06

and forward all your coments to Erick at his request.

Michael

Posted on Wed, 08/08/2012 - 22:46

I love my Macomber, as I think most Macomber owners do, but there are a couple of little things I'd like to see

- I use the super hooks because the regular hooks don't line up with the holes in the lams.  I have 18 treddles on a 40 inch loom and I've spaced them a bit to make room for my feet.   Some hooks just won't stay on the loom.   I'd like to see some sort of thing that I could insert into that slot in the treddle that would come up through the treddle and allow me to attach texsolv to it easily from the top side of the treddle.  This thing might be a piece of metal with holes that could take S hooks and that I could attach the texsolv loops to.

- Make some way to prevent the warp beam from lurching when I step on the brake release.   I've rigged a mechanism to do this thanks to some help from Michael, but still, I shouldn't have to.

- That handle that is used to wind on the warp - it is made to just slip on and off the axel.  That is fine, but I keep forgetting to take it off, and then at some point it falls off while I'm weaving.   I have several ugly dents in my hard wood floor as a result.  There should be a set screw that I can use to keep that handle on.   People could use the set screw or not, but I'd use it and save my floor.  I have little rug there now, but I think it shouldn't do that in the first place.

It's so great that they are thinking of ways to improve these wonderful looms!

 

 

Posted on Wed, 08/08/2012 - 22:50

I aggree with you about the handle. A set screw would be nice. I am copying your message and sending it to Erick. About the hooks you could drill out a hole to line up with the treadle.

 

Michael

Posted on Thu, 08/09/2012 - 02:24

Yes, I know I could drill holes, but not easily.  There are 12 harnesses and 18 treddles - that's a lot of holes.   Plus they aren't that easy to drill in steel unless I'd take the lams off, and that alone is more work than I want.   Plus, I've "invested" in a lot of super hooks.   I want to either use them or switch to texsolv.   I don't actually have any hooks that are the regular kind, and I was never a fan of getting the hooks into those little holes - even if I had the holes in the right places on the lams.

Isn't there a way to get the supper hooks to stay on?   Only a few of them cause problems, and I've marked them to avoid using those.  They look the same as the others to me, so I don't understand why some are a problem and others aren't.

 

Posted on Tue, 08/28/2012 - 19:24

I have a 40" Macomber B5C that I bought at auction about 12 years ago. I paid $100 for it, equiped with only 4 harnesses and 6 treadles at the time. There is a Macomber 50th anniversary sticker on the side showing the loom was in use in 1986. I know the loom was used in university classes and shuffled between several departments over it's life. This, and all the others that were in the auction, is still sound and quite serviceable.

The loom came with the hooks that go over the top of the lams and I rarely have any drop off. (I'd almost say "never" but I have had it happen once or twice.)

I've just today started weaving on my second large project summer project on Mab (my name for the old girl). As I was threading I made some notes about what I like and what I'd like to see improved.

-Relative ease of adding/moving/removing heddles. Since the heddle bars are open on the ends I have added/moved heddles even with a warp on. With a minimum of unprintable words expressed, I'll add. This is a big contrast to my Schact Baby Wolf. I do wish Macomber would come up with something better than the flimsy brads that hold the heddle bars in the frames. I've replaced mine with short pieces of wire which work better but still aren't perfect.

-Being able to change the tie-up in the middle of a series rather than having to take all the tie-ups off to change one. In contrast, again with the BW, if I want to change a treadle from 2, 3, 5 to 1, 3, 5 all three tie-up cords have to come off. On Mab I just remove 2 and add 1.

-Good shed on Macomber. I never weave with rags.

-Love, love, love the back hinged treadles. And love that the treadles track in the same plane all the time. Last year I have many screaming fits over the floating treadles on a Glimakra whacking my ankles.

-Others have mentioned the beauty of being able to lay the breast or back beam down flat for threading. I love that, too. I do wish there was a way to drop the treadles out of the way without removing all the tie-up hooks. I usually warp back to front and the treadles hit my shins when I'm threading unless I untie them. Compared to the trouble I had tying up the Glimakra mentioned above, removing all the tie-ups is not a big deal.

-I love the floating reed cap that allows use of reeds of different heights.

The only thing I can think of that bugs me is that sometimes a harness frame gets caught in the heddles of a neighbor so that I don't get the proper shed. I know I need to be paying attention to catch this when it happens but it can be annoying.

Ah, back now to my wonderful loom.

RAP

Posted on Tue, 08/28/2012 - 19:30

I have a 40" Macomber B5C that I bought at auction about 12 years ago. I paid $100 for it, equiped with only 4 harnesses and 6 treadles at the time. There is a Macomber 50th anniversary sticker on the side showing the loom was in use in 1986. I know the loom was used in university classes and shuffled between several departments over it's life. This, and all the others that were in the auction, is still sound and quite serviceable.

The loom came with the hooks that go over the top of the lams and I rarely have any drop off. (I'd almost say "never" but I have had it happen once or twice.)

I've just today started weaving on my second large project summer project on Mab (my name for the old girl). As I was threading I made some notes about what I like and what I'd like to see improved.

-Relative ease of adding/moving/removing heddles. Since the heddle bars are open on the ends I have added/moved heddles even with a warp on. With a minimum of unprintable words expressed, I'll add. This is a big contrast to my Schact Baby Wolf. I do wish Macomber would come up with something better than the flimsy brads that hold the heddle bars in the frames. I've replaced mine with short pieces of wire which work better but still aren't perfect.

-Being able to change the tie-up in the middle of a series rather than having to take all the tie-ups off to change one. In contrast, again with the BW, if I want to change a treadle from 2, 3, 5 to 1, 3, 5 all three tie-up cords have to come off. On Mab I just remove 2 and add 1.

-Good shed on Macomber. I never weave with rags.

-Love, love, love the back hinged treadles. And love that the treadles track in the same plane all the time. Last year I have many screaming fits over the floating treadles on a Glimakra whacking my ankles.

-Others have mentioned the beauty of being able to lay the breast or back beam down flat for threading. I love that, too. I do wish there was a way to drop the treadles out of the way without removing all the tie-up hooks. I usually warp back to front and the treadles hit my shins when I'm threading unless I untie them. Compared to the trouble I had tying up the Glimakra mentioned above, removing all the tie-ups is not a big deal.

-I love the floating reed cap that allows use of reeds of different heights.

The only thing I can think of that bugs me is that sometimes a harness frame gets caught in the heddles of a neighbor so that I don't get the proper shed. I know I need to be paying attention to catch this when it happens but it can be annoying.

Ah, back now to my wonderful loom.

RAP

Posted on Thu, 08/30/2012 - 22:51

You can replace your flimsy brads with small safety pins (like I did) or small cotter pins.

Posted on Sun, 09/09/2012 - 20:18

I don't that a knee beam is really needed, but it would be great to have some modification (perhaps a 'taller' breast beam?) that would prevent the bottom of the beater bar from having the potential to rub against the fabric after it goes over the breast beam.   This can happen now if the warp is advanced too far.  While I certainly understand the variety of problems that can be caused by advancing a warp too far at once, a rubbing beater bar should not be among them.

Posted on Wed, 01/09/2013 - 01:24


Issues with the CP BabyMac

I know I am coming lately to this forum but it never occured to me my B4, 48", 8H Macomber could be improved... and then, I adopted a BabyMac. It is my nature to seek solutions and not wallow in problems or hope problems will solve themselves. I have attached a link to a list of my issues with the BabyMac I bought this summer, my second of now three Macomber looms. I love the little loom, it's size and design, but maybe my loom might be a "lemon" or maybe it has similar issues others have encountered. Please, I just want it to work!

I will not paste the entire document here because it is long and includes photos. It is a PDF which may download to your computer and open with Adobe Acrobat. 

www.adsense2.com/BabyMac01092013.pdf

Posted on Wed, 01/09/2013 - 01:33

Hi Isabella-Check where your beater attaches to the frame of the loom. There is a metal piece down there that screws into the beater and also the frame. That piece should be in an upright position. When the screws get loose, it sags and the warp doesn't sit on the shuttle race. If it isn't vertical, loosen the screws, get it in the correct position and tighten.

Also check and make sure that the clips that hold the heddle bars in place (both in the center and at the edges) are secured on harness 7 and 8, although, if you've got bigger Macombers, you probably know that by now.

Posted on Wed, 01/09/2013 - 02:41

Like Dena said there is a cam that you need to adjust. But this will not fix the fact that the frames raise on one side. This can be caused by a bent lamm or a very dirty side track. Have you giving this loom a good cleaning? Why 7 & 8 come up together could also be a bent lamm. Are any of thr treadles tied together? This baby is like her big brother, tough. We will find out what is wrong with your baby.Michael

Posted on Wed, 01/09/2013 - 06:28

Great! we're definitely on the road to solutions!. I did check the metal pieces on each side and they are tight and upright. And, yes, the clips are holding the lamms as intended. you are right, the big Mac's teach us lots of valuable things. I don't see any significant bending but I haven't taken all the lamms and harnesses out to lay on a flat surface to really check. Willing to try any suggestions. Thanks

Posted on Wed, 01/09/2013 - 06:28

Great! we're definitely on the road to solutions!. I did check the metal pieces on each side and they are tight and upright. And, yes, the clips are holding the lamms as intended. you are right, the big Mac's teach us lots of valuable things. I don't see any significant bending but I haven't taken all the lamms and harnesses out to lay on a flat surface to really check. Willing to try any suggestions. Thanks

Posted on Wed, 01/09/2013 - 06:28

Great! we're definitely on the road to solutions!. I did check the metal pieces on each side and they are tight and upright. And, yes, the clips are holding the lamms as intended. you are right, the big Mac's teach us lots of valuable things. I don't see any significant bending but I haven't taken all the lamms and harnesses out to lay on a flat surface to really check. Willing to try any suggestions. Thanks

Posted on Sun, 01/05/2014 - 12:03

I am considering buying a new Baby Mac, and was wondering if Macomber Looms ever went anywhere with all these concerns? Were changes made in the design? I really don't want to purchase a loom and be unhappy with it.

Posted on Sun, 01/05/2014 - 14:25

My question to you is are you looking for a small loom or one that can be transported?

Michael

Posted on Sun, 01/05/2014 - 14:51

A small loom. My DH and I will be living full time in a 45' motorhome sometime later this year, and I want an 8H loom that will travel with us. It probably won't leave the motorhome, but space is a real issue.

Posted on Sun, 01/05/2014 - 15:10

Lets look at the figures. A 24/8 baby Mac weights 60 pounds and cost $1443. A 24/8 Macomber weights 190 pounds and cost $2569. What is the differents. The baby is made from plywood, the other is made of Maple wood. The Macomber used jacks to pull up the heddle frames, the baby uses its lamms to push up the frames. The Macomber petals (treadles) are pushed down. the baby's treadles are operated like a cars gas petal.  The baby is a little smaller in height. For my money I would go with the Macomber. This is a loom that you will fall in love with.

Michael

Posted on Sun, 01/05/2014 - 15:28

I just finished a long (for me) warp on my Macomber.   I do love that loom.   But I'm still having one annoying problem with it:   Every so often one of the shafts gets caught on one of the other shafts and one end of a shaft either fails to fall or gets pulled up when I'm changing sheds.   Yes, I gently ride the treddle down, have the S hooks closed, etc. etc.   It still happens from time to time.

I believe this is a design flaw with the shafts:   The shaft rectangle is welded together, but the pieces at the corners overlap, creating an edge that gets caught.   If the welding joint were different, or there was a glob of metal there so that the sharp edge went away, then I believe this wouldn't happen. 

I've tried putting black electrical tape there - on all 4 corners of all 12 shafts, but eventually the tape gets loose and it happens again.  This is really annoying and is not just a "nice to have" - it makes a mess of the weaving!   And after all, weaving is the point!

Posted on Sun, 01/05/2014 - 16:12

Well, I should have said that size AND weight are both issues. 190 pounds is too much weight to drive around, even if it doesn't leave the MH. I know that there is a trade off with a small loom, but we'll be living in 400 square feet of space and I still want an 8 harness loom. I think a Baby Mac (20") is a compromise I can live with.

But to get back to my original question, did Macomber ever address the concerns people expressed here?

Posted on Sun, 01/05/2014 - 16:20

Ask around for an opportunity to weave on a Baby Mac.  My 2007 8-shaft Baby is made of solid wood, not plywood.  I changed the brake to a friction brake.  It's not as fast as a heavy loom, but it works just fine.  My only issue is sometimes the treadle tie-ups get hung up.  Some thing happens on my big Herald.  Every loom has it's quirks and you just work with them or around them.  The Baby Mac is much easier to deal with than the Harrisville (swinging shafts) or the Baby Wolf (too wide for your motorhome).

Posted on Sun, 01/05/2014 - 16:38

Interesting point, I only ones I have seen have been plywood.

Posted on Sun, 01/05/2014 - 17:11

Well, I just put my order in. I'm glad to hear it's not plywood! I did order the friction brake and the aprons. And the wing nut /longer bolt change that Dena suggested. I know that every loom has its quirks--I have had several including a HD workshop loom. I expect there will be things I don't love about the Baby Mac, but I'm willing to work through issues. I don't want a Baby Wolf, and prefer a floor loom. 20" wide is really perfect, sizewise. I guess I'll just have to see how I like it.

I am happy there is this group, in case I run into problems!

Posted on Sun, 01/05/2014 - 18:41

Sorry, with the time zone difference, I peacefully slept through all these comments but will respond. I still love my Baby Mac and yes, I still have issues but not as many. No, Macomber did not respond but Sarah Haskell did offer some suggestions. I have oiled and/or silicone sprayed every possible place which also helped. I have used the Baby Mac now for a couple of handtowel projects, a transparancy sampler, a hand dyed warp/weft silk scarf, 20/2 Optical Illusion dishtowels, a Sheep to Shawl competition with handspun warp and weft, Rep weave workshop with Rosalie Neilson, and a Three Block Rug weaving workshop with Jason Collinwood. In every case, there have been errors caused by harnesses dropping or catching that  did not show on the top but only on the bottom of the weaving. Some I caught and was able to fix before advancing too far and others are there to stay. I have learned to memorize the raised harness pattern and watch it carefully and to check the tie-up frequently. As I said before, I think, I modified the "Super Hooks" so the hook in the lamm is a closed hook and requires a screwdriver or plyers to open when tying up plus a tight rubber "washer" to hopefully keep it tight and at the top. It helps but is not a total solution as the harness frames occasionally still catch on each other as said in the comment above. My tension issues seemed to be resolved...not sure exactly what helped as I did lots of things and something or combination helped. I have two back beams and have only been able to get tension on one so that is the one I use. I have a small, snug piece of PVC pipe on the back frame hindges on each side as I was finding the hindges released often during weaving and the tension would be off and lopsided. I have to unscrew the hindges each time I move it to take off/put on the PVC and tie with some rubber intertube strips but that is doable. The shed is still not as wide as I think it should be because the warp does not rest on the beater chase but about 1/2"-3/4" above. The advance is limited because the beater rubs the finished weaving under the breast beam so I just advance smaller amounts and more often. I have watched and examined every other loom in every workshop and am still glad I have the Baby Mac and haven't found another I want. I happen to live in "Baby Wolf Country" and for whatever reason, they are not as appealing as the Macomber. We have bonded. It is easy to transport in the back of my Mini Cooper Countryman (larger Mini Cooper) but does take two people to lift in and out easily. Mine is a combination of nicely finished plywood and maple. I still have my beloved 8H 48" Macomber (which in over 35 years has never given me a concern or issue) and a new additon, a 12H 40" Macomber that has it's own set of issues I am working through to resolve. It apparently had not been particularily loved or cared for and I have only done one set of towels on it so far and plan on putting on a rag rug warp to see if I can identify the issues with a simpler project. 

Hope this helps. Thank you for including me in your questions. 

Posted on Sun, 01/05/2014 - 19:11

I've had a baby Macomber for about thirty years and still enjoy weaving on it.  I replaced the hooks with Texsolv which resolved the dropping hook syndrome.  The cords are looped over the lamms and are inserted into the slots on the treadles.  The cords are long enough that they touch the floor and  can remain in the treadles with an anchor that is moved into the correct position when needed. The trick is getting the treadles and Texsolv lined up to create a good shed. I ended up tying up all the shafts with a hook to see the height necessary for creating the shed--only need one hook per shaft and can be on any treadle. Next I marked the cords to show where the anchor should be placed. Now I know where to place the anchors when tying up a new treadling.  

In addition to eleviating the dropping-hook syndrome, the Texsolv ties can remain in place when folding up the loom!

Some years ago I replaced all the heddles with inserted-eye heddles.  They are much faster to thread and accomodate a wide range of yarns.

Coolsticks--enjoy your new loom!

Janet

 


 

 

 

Posted on Thu, 03/20/2014 - 04:12

I'm wondering if anyone has considered converting the tie-up hooks on a Baby Mac to the tie-up cords, or similar, that Schacht Baby Wolf looms use.  If one were to unscrew the little screws at the far ends of the treadles so that they are open like the BW treadles are, could one simply thread only the tie-up cords you needed?  I realize that Texsolv could work but I'm intrigued with a system as well designed and easy to engage as Schacht's is.

Morgan

Posted on Thu, 03/20/2014 - 04:35

I have a 40"- 10 harness Mac and love it, love it, love it.  However, one thing that would be nice is that if there was something like the Mighty Wolf loom has which is the Wolf Trap.  This is a nifty little accessory that you can rest your shuttles, threading hook and other things you are currently weaving with on the outside of the breast beam.  I know the Macs come with the toolbox up on the castle, but they are often too tall/deep to see what you have in them.  I am a tall person and I don't like having to fish for things.   I realize that the posture at the Mac is alot different than at the Schacht Wolf series of looms and that may be why.  But it might be worth looking into as an option.  Using a bench with side storage is my work around so, I can see what I need.     I also agree with the set screw for the back beam handle.  Too many times I am weaving and it falls on the hardwood floor.  

Thank you,

annali

Posted on Thu, 03/20/2014 - 21:15

I have just the opposite feelings about storage in both places, but possibly we don't use them for the same thing.  The wolf trap is better than nothing, but I don't find it nearly as convenient for resting shuttles as the broad breast beam of the B type Macomber, and it isn't as good for small things as the castle tray on the Mac because it squishes and leaks out the ends.  It's fortunate I don't have to reach far on my Wolf, because when I do on the Mac I tend to belly up to the breast beam and spread my arms.  I keep my treadle hooks in the tray under the bench, but for shuttles, battens, tension boxes, etc not in use I have to  store them elsewhere.  If I'm using more than 2 shuttles I use the bench, as that is the only way I get the rotation right so the edges are consistent.

If you want to make a lift-on, lift-off storage area to the front, you could add a single bar with suspended pockets.  That way the weaver would not be backed off as far, and they could actually get more storage area.

If it's just an option though, those that don't want it don't have to get it.

Posted on Thu, 03/20/2014 - 22:25

I have not done it but it is on the list of considerations. I have a good friend who has done it and swears it is the best solution ever. She said it wasn't a "no-brainer" but somewhat a challenge and took a couple of different adjustments to get it right but was worth the time and effort. Next time I am there, I will take a photo and link it to the site which might help. Yes, she used real Baby Wolf tie ups and did not try to adapt Texsolv. 

 

Posted on Thu, 03/20/2014 - 22:53

While I am posting, I have more questions, this time about a 42" 12H Macomber. The harness frames hang about an inch and half out of level which affects the shed. I have checked the level on every part, horizontal and vertical and everything else, including the floor are very close to level. I have counted the links in the chains, looked at everything I can see and think of and if I could find the issue, of course, I would have fixed it by now. Any suggestions? Thanks

 

Posted on Fri, 03/21/2014 - 01:04

IsabellaParrott-

My Macomber is a 40 inch, 12 shaft with 18 treddles.   That means that my treddles take up all the space under the loom, left to right.  I find that when I'm using the treddles at the far right or far left, the shafts don't get lifted parallel to the floor.   I think it must be because they are attached to the far edge of the lams, and that is just too much force for the mechanics to overcome.   The treddles in the middle lift just fine.

Are all your shafts out of level, or just some, or just when you use some treddles?   Have you measured the positions of the holes in the jacks?   Are they in the same places on the right and left jacks for a given shaft?

Posted on Fri, 03/21/2014 - 02:07

Good suggestions, I'll check that out. Right now, I just have 4 harnesses on the loom... doing simple rugs until I can figure this out but can re-hang the additional 8H. Yes, all are out of level but the 4 closest to the beater are not as bad as the rest but they are not progressive... all the rest are out close to the same amount. Have 14 treadles and I moved them all to the center. When I got it, they were spread out across the entire width.... maybe there was a reason for that? 

Posted on Fri, 03/21/2014 - 14:22

The treadles need to be spread out enough so that your feet don't push 2 at once.

As to the jacks, make sure that the the jacks are on correctly and the chains are the same length.  The holes in the jacks closest to the weaver should have the holes nearest the outside of the loom, and the ones farthest from the weaver should have the holes closest to the pivot point.

Posted on Sun, 03/23/2014 - 13:34

There are a number of things that can cause this problem. Is this on all the shafts?  First check that all of your heddle hooks are locked. Are the jack pads in good shape? You made need to clean/lub the grooves that the lamms move in. Knowing if it is effecting all the shafts will help.

Michael

Posted on Sun, 03/23/2014 - 13:40

Even on a 56/16 mac all the shafts lift level. Check to see that all the hooks are directly over the treadles. The other thing is you may not be pushing "down" on the outside treadles but pushing more side ways because of the reach. Try standing off to the side an pushing down on the treadle and see what happens.

Michael 

Posted on Tue, 03/25/2014 - 03:14

I would expect the shafts to life evenly on a 56/16, but I have a 40/18.  That means that the outside treddles are about a half inch from the end of the lams.   56 inches is a lot of space for 16 treddles.   40 inches isn't much space if you have 18 treddles, and have them spaced enough to have room for your feet!  

If you don't believe me, move one of those treddles to within a half inch from the end of the lam and then tell me if it lifts evenly!

 

Posted on Tue, 03/25/2014 - 14:08

Imy handle was always falling off also, but then I put a magnet on it...about the size of a dime.and it doesn't fall off now...easy fix that I really didn't expect to work...but it did! I will try to send a picture...

Posted on Tue, 03/25/2014 - 14:38

On my 20 shaft 48" Mac I have 22 treadles.  They are close together -- to the point where I can't weave with shoes on.  The hooks on the end treadles are close to the edges of the loom.  While the lamms on the edges don't lift evenly, the shafts do, or at least there is no apparent difference in shed height from edge to edge.  I have never found it to be a problem, although I have noticed the difference in the lamms.  I noticed because it seems to take more force to lift the shafts on the outermost treadles than the center ones, and I wanted to see the cause.  

In point of fact, very few things necessitate my use of the outermost treadles, although it happens because if they're there, I'll use them.  I try to design my threadings and tie ups to use them less than the central treadles, though.

What would cause me concern would be if my shed were not even.  That would be a problem.  Even though I know what you're saying about the end treadles, on my loom it is not linked to uneven sheds -- just thunder thigh muscles (that match spinner calves).

Posted on Tue, 04/08/2014 - 23:46

On a different thread ReedGuy (I think) mentioned that the LeClerc tension box has topless reeds at either end that allow one to not cut the ends of the warp when threading.  This means you could slip the warp over a bar, keep the cross intact while using a chained warp on the sectional beam, or lay in the warp into the tension box without rethreading. I was interested in doing the latter in order to save time.

The Macomber tension box works perfectly if you are beaming warp from a spool rack.  On shorter warps, filling up the spools does not make sense, so I use a chained warp on the sectional beam.  Strange, I know. In order to save beaming time, I got a LeClerc tension box, and found that in order to not have it fall forward on the rail on which it slides, I had to add some bolts along the bottom of the clamp, plus a sponge to keep it from nicking the rail.  It still does not have the balance or the slide of the Macomber tension box.

So, my suggestion is that Macomber should offer a comb or reed structure instead of the black plastic thing with holes in it that looks like pegboard.  Because that black plastic thing spreads the warp coming into the tensioner, it does keep it more tangle free than the reed.  If they sold such a thing, I would buy it.

Posted on Wed, 04/09/2014 - 14:32

The Macomber tension box has both a reed and the plastic thing.  Mine is 1980 or so vintage.  If you look on the Macomber website you will see the black plastic thing in the tension box picture.  The LeClerc tension box has 2 reeds.  Because on both all the reeds are topless, it's only the black plastic thing that needs to be threaded each time.

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