Welcome/Introductions

Oh boy! After 6 years as a text-only list, H-Weaving moves to Weavolution! As usual on a moving day, there's dust, boxes, and some things simply don't work...yet. However, we'll get the bugs worked out as fast as humanly possible. Drop by...ask questions...tell us what you're planning or weaving...post pictures! For those new to the list, I'm Dawn, the "ListMom" of H-Weaving (http://groups.yahoo.com/group/h-weaving/) and a longtime fiberholic with a passion for historical textiles. Most of my weaving these days is done on my 45" Gilmore X-frame, my Leclerc Cendrel inkle loom (which also makes a dandy warping board), and my Weave-Its and Weavettes (small handheld looms). So, tell us about yourself--who are you and what are you working on?

Comments

Posted on Sun, 05/17/2009 - 15:34

Hello, I'm Sharon Palmer and one of the volunteers in defining and testing Weavolution. I'm also the owner or moderator for six Yahoo groups.

In the SCA, I'm Ranvaig the Weaver. I own an handmade inkle loom, rigid heddle loom, and a handmade carpet weaving sample loom (which still has the sample from the class). For a couple of years I borrowed a Warp Weighted loom, and hope to build my own soon. I haven't been weaving as much for the last 12 years because I have arthritis and repetitive motions are bad for me, but working on Weavolution inspired me to dig out the inkle loom and start warping some silk for a belt for my daughter. She doesn't know it yet, but she is going to weave her own belt.

Posted on Thu, 05/21/2009 - 16:55

Dawn,
I hadn't even known there *was* an H-weaving yahoo list; but then I'm more recently back to weaving after a few decades' absence. I've kept the inkle going, and have a Gilmore X-frame 36" 4H loom parked out on long-term loan with a friend, a 40" Norwood 4H cherrywood loom just waiting to be strung up with some table linens, an older Glimåkra table loom with 4 levers, a Beka 20" rigid heddle frame loom that my mom sent along out of her stash, and that Ashford inkle that stays busy with useful items. I've also fallen in with Enabling spinners, and have not one but two loaner wheels and a regular Monday-evening session, a couple of drop spindles, the light top-whorl being my current fave (a person can get lace-weight on this thing!)
Ranvaig, I'm looking forward to hearing more about your daughter's inkle belt (her first inkling?)
I belonged to the SCA decades ago, and while life's too busy any more, have a great fondness for the Society, especially in terms of the arts & sciences it fosters. I've also worked RenFests and the Renaissance Faires; the folks who come together to put on a show that size make a splendid community. Some handwoven wares for Dickens Faire garb lurk in my hind-brain and thus in my future, I'm certain.

Posted on Sat, 05/23/2009 - 01:11

W00T!!! We gots replies! 8-D

Uh...anytime you feel the need to divest yourself of that Norwood, I probably could find space for it. ;-) Seriously though, I'm holding out for a Gilmore Gem or Gem II, as I could really use both a sampling loom and an 8-shaft loom.

I'm an enabler too--two of my friends now own wheels, multiple spindles, and one just got a nice little Leclerc 4H table loom and stand, so she's quickly becoming a weaver.

If you worked at RPFN or Heart of the Forest Faire in the past 15 years, we've probably run into each other at some point.

Posted on Sat, 05/30/2009 - 04:03

 Hi,

Dawn, you've met me before.....

I tend to weave modern stuff at home, but I'm a docent at Sutter's Fort in Sacramento, where I'm often doing spinning and weaving related things.  (I haven't been lately, I had a bout with bursitius and it hurt to even climb over the bench to get to the loom, especially in 1840's clothing.)

I do have a historical project in my plans, some linsey woolsey yardage to make an apron with.  I have most of the wool spun, and I've dyed some linen with indigo.....

Posted on Tue, 06/09/2009 - 01:03

Hi everyone, great to see more SCA and other historical weavers!  I do mostly tablet weaving for sale but lately I've been experimenting with Viking Twills on my Baby Wolf loom.  I've also done some inkle weaving, in fact I do most of my tablet weaving on an inkle loom, but I'm really enjoying my floor loom.  I also have a 4 shaft table loom, but I don't get as many chance to use it.  But I'm looking forward to seeing what everyone's doing.

Posted on Tue, 06/09/2009 - 02:17

Hello, another SCA-person here (Drachenwald). I used to be quite active in the SCA before, but now I only attend 1 or 2 events per year. I've become more and more obsessed with clothing my family in handwoven garb, it's a slow process, but fun.

Before I started weaving more seriously on my floor loom, I wove tablet-weaving quite a lot. I like complex patterns, but since my daughter was born, it's hard to find the concentration needed (not to mention how upset I got when she found one of my weavings, and played with it!)

Besides my Viking/mediaeval interest, I also have a "thing" for 19th century history, and textiles, but I have so much to learn in that field. I'm sure you all will enlighten me :)

Posted on Tue, 06/09/2009 - 04:55

 Hello all, I'm a Roman 1st century C.E. re-enactor and a 20 year plus SCA member. My fine husband built a warp weighted loom for me, only one warp put on it so far but it is linen, and I demoed for three months worth of weekends at a  museum. I have a unbranded 8H floor loom and a 8H Dorothy table loom in storage waiting for TLC to bring them back to working condition; an inkle loom that stays fairly busy and have done backstrap band weaving, including a peculiar Irish variant described as weaving on your toe. Tablet weaving keeps calling me back, like a siren. On a later historical note, I make bobbin lace.  Enablers seem to be common here, I've gotten a couple of friends seriously hooked on spinning, both with spindle and wheel.

 

Looking forward to learning together! 

Posted on Wed, 06/10/2009 - 19:55

I'm Jahanarabanu Vivana in the SCA, yep I use my SCA name for all my online stuff. I have a 7th Century Persian persona, sometimes known in Drachenwald as the worst Viking persona ever, haha!

I have been in the SCA for 14 years, and that sounds so crazy to say! I'm in Drachenwald now (for the past 5 years), Calontir before that. I am best know for the fact that I have about 20 looms, most of them small looms. I've been weaving since I was about 12, my mom taught me and some day I'll get to ship her looms over here.

I am currently house shopping and the two main considerations are the size of the fenced yard for my dog, and which house in my price range has the best weaving studio space!

I've been looking forward to Weavolution for about 6 months and am so glad we're all finally here!

Posted on Fri, 06/26/2009 - 01:09

Hi,

In SCA I am Leofwyn Weaver; in the 18th century I am often Dinah the Runaway Indentured Servant. I also sell fabrics at TimeTravelTextiles.com, and sometimes in person at events. I've recently been working on doublewave linen tapes for 18th century, and am about to try weaving some twill winingas for 9th/10th century.

I also just kidnapped a 52" counterbalance loom from craigslist. It's in pieces in my car. i want to refurbish it to use for demos; over time I want to replace components with more period-authentic ones, and if I'm still weaving when that's done, I want to build a loom that's another step closer to authenticity, using what I've learned from making parts for this one. Though today it seems like I'm more likely to be replacing the weaver first.

Anyway I hope that I can get the hang of Weavolution; I never really acclimatized to yahoo groups. ;-)

 

Posted on Sun, 07/05/2009 - 13:17

Hi folks!

  I weave on an unknown, cobbled together four shaft counterbalance loom.  I'm attempting a 9 yard warp, thirty inches wide with 10/2 cotton at the moment.  I missed the lesson on warping, being mostly self taught.  I've taken several workshops in the past couple of years, learning such cool things as Swedish towel weaving, four shaft diversification, shaft switch rug technique, and Acadian style weaving.  Still missed the warping lesson.  I want to make a pair of pants for my husband, and a shirt for myself out of the fabric, which will weave just fine if I ever get it warped.  It will be warped for huck lace, and I'll try some of the variations that I learned from Robyn Spady's workshop "extreme warp makeover".

  At Black Sheep Gathering last month, I purchased a Glimakra band loom.  This is the type that you sit sideways to the loom for weaving.  It can be set up as an inkle, or a counterbalance loom.  I set up the counterbalance.  I can weave a  band very quickly on this loom!  I'm making seam binding for the above.

  Although I'm not involved in any historical reinactment, I'm very interested in weaving throughout history. 

Aunt Janet

Posted on Sat, 07/11/2009 - 13:37

Hi !!  I have a 1949 Sears 6-harness loom and a couple old inkle looms and a Baby wolf which I use most. My interest is mostly Shaker weaves and early fine threads. I also knit and have been really interested in how knitting has been influenced by different groups.I build a warp weighted loom a number of years ago but find it hard to use as I get older!!

Mary

Posted on Tue, 07/28/2009 - 18:31

Greetings,  I'm Robert Schweitzer (aka Rufus in the SCA).  I started weaving almost 2 decades ago after a friend took out Collingwood's book from the library and said  - "Let's try this!".

So I am first and foremost a tablet weaver, although I've done a tiny amount of work on a table loom and jack loom.

If you have looked in the projects recently, you will have seen my historical reconstruction of an ethiopian curtain.  I'm really more into the Norse brocades, but as a tablet weaver, how could I not be intrigued by the prospect of creating a 6 x 12 foot piece.  Especially when one of them is in the same city as me (under storage at the ROM and they haven't let me look at it yet - grrrr).

This is the second historical reconstruction for me.  The first was recreating a band from the grave of the bishop of cantelupe.  The ROM let me look at this one under a microscope to plot the pattern.  The pattern took 144 cards and then after I wove about 6 inches, Nancy Spies and Peter Collingwood informed me that the piece wasn't actually tablet weaving, that it was a warp faced pick up of some kind.  (they were looking at the other half of the piece in the british museum)  Kind of hard to argue with that sort of authority.

That all took place about 15 years ago, and I've learned a lot since then, but I would love a thread on identifying different weaving techniques in artifacts.  Weavolution is the ideal setting for that sort of thread since most techniques are represented.

Posted on Fri, 08/14/2009 - 20:12

Hello!  Just discovering Weavolution!  I'm an 18th c. reenactor (Rev War) and have (and use) several old looms including a ca 1800 barn frame loom that has been retrofitted with a 6H countermarch system.  I occasionally help out in the Education Department at the American Textile History Museum in Lowell MA, and love demonstrating and teaching people to weave and spin.  As the director of a local history museum, I'm fascinated by pretty much anything old - good thing, eh?   

Posted on Fri, 09/11/2009 - 18:11

Hi, I'm Careena. I was a Jr Docent at the Colonial Complex for the York County Heritage Trust (York PA) this summer. I loved it to death! The loom they had for demos looked alot like a Wolf Pup. The second week I was there, they pulled somebody down from the board to warp it. Apparently she hadn't woven for a long time. You would've loved how they were warping it. Pulled one string out at a time (8/2 Unmercerized) and measured it against the next one, they didn't even know how long it was. I didn't want to "intrude" because I thought she knew what she was doing. She looked at me and said, "We need 240 of these." "You know, there is a warping board in there," I said. "You want to use it, go ahead." I don't know how else she expected me to do it. I wound off a bunch and handed them to her. She proceeded to cut off the thrums I used to keep them together and pulled out one string far enough to give herself room to work. She out it through the reed, through the heddle, and pulled it out the back, draping it over the back beam. I let her do 40 ends that way, then offered to "show her how I do it." Fortunatly, she figured I did ok and let me take over. I've kind of been in charge of the loom ever since.

One of the buildings the Trust owns is a log house who's owner was a jaquard coverlet weaver in the early to mid 1800s (he built the house in 1812). None of the docents knew much about jacquard looms and the topic was sadly overlooked, sometimes being called a Jack Card loom. In July, I went out to the National Museum of the American Coverlet and found out more. I came back and that was my strong point. I insisted on tagging along on the other docents tours to explain.

My own loom is from the 1940s and is still going strong. It's one of the few things they "make like they used to."

And in case you were wondering, I had to pull out the 40 ends the lady from the Trust warped, because they were so incredibly tangled, even my older sister couldn't save them.

Careena

Posted on Fri, 09/11/2009 - 23:31

Hi all (wave!)

I'm hoping you can point me in the right direction.

I'm interested in two time periods.

Israel 1st century CE, I've read the Bible many times and I'm interested in what kind of fabric the apostle Paul would have used to make tents. Also surrounding regions like Persia, Egypt, etc.

Early California, pre-colonial to early 1800s.

Any clues to where to begin research would be appreciated.

Have a good day!

Franco Rios

Posted on Sat, 09/12/2009 - 05:30

 Franco-  what are you looking for about early CA?  Most goods were actually imported into the state, but some missions and forts had small "factories" too.

The native Californians did have a weaving culture in basket weaving.  If you go to the Indian Museum by Sutter's Fort you can see some and they can answer some questions.  I'll be at the fort tomorrow, but we'll be teaching parents very basic weaving and spinning for ELP so we won't be able to talk to the general public.

Posted on Sat, 09/12/2009 - 05:39

I guess I'm interested in whatever was being woven in early Calif. for cloth or blankets. I'm thinking that once the Spanish sheep arrive that wool is harvested and spun somewhere!

I've been looking at the basket weaving to find examples of animal patterns, like rabbit patterns! I found a couple that I liked enough to try when I get some time for them.

Have a good day at Sutters Fort tomorrow. Drink plenty of water.

Franco Rios

Posted on Sat, 09/12/2009 - 06:19

 Yes, the little bit of weaving that was being done was because of the flocks of sheep.  Sutter even has notes in his papers about crossing his sheep with a merino ram to improve the wool.  There was blanket weaving going on at the fort.  (this would have been in the 1840's)

My grandpa used to use the basket patterns to piece together in wood and then he'd turn them into bowls, vases and boxes.

I'm hoping to be able to take off about 12:30-1:00.  I just stuck some gatorade in the fridge to bring.  It was gorgeous Wednesday evening there, so why did it have to heat up?

Posted on Sun, 04/11/2010 - 19:39

I'm new here, I'll introduce myself.  I teach weaving and have done historic weaving and interpretation at historic sites in Virginia.  I'm not a production weaver, but I enjoy examining old textiles and figuring out how and why they were done. 

My last weave analysis was a four-shaft barleycorn that used fine warps and a fine weft "tabby" alternated with a very thick pattern pick.  The original was probably from the 1890's and was a white on white crib coverlet.  I re-created it as samples for my weaving guild using 20/2 cotton and Lily Sugar and Cream.

I'm just glad I can now weave in my blue jeans at home instead of that silly mob-cap! 

 

Posted on Fri, 07/09/2010 - 12:17

Hi - I just discovered your posting.  I am also interested in Shaker weaves and would love to learn more about them.   I am going to be warping my Norwood with linen for the first time this week.  I just was able to add the additional 4 harnesses to make it an 8 harness and that was quite an adventure!   What resources would you recommend for learning more about the Shaker textiles?    

donna 

Posted on Sun, 05/17/2009 - 15:34

Hello, I'm Sharon Palmer and one of the volunteers in defining and testing Weavolution. I'm also the owner or moderator for six Yahoo groups.

In the SCA, I'm Ranvaig the Weaver. I own an handmade inkle loom, rigid heddle loom, and a handmade carpet weaving sample loom (which still has the sample from the class). For a couple of years I borrowed a Warp Weighted loom, and hope to build my own soon. I haven't been weaving as much for the last 12 years because I have arthritis and repetitive motions are bad for me, but working on Weavolution inspired me to dig out the inkle loom and start warping some silk for a belt for my daughter. She doesn't know it yet, but she is going to weave her own belt.

Posted on Thu, 05/21/2009 - 16:55

Dawn,
I hadn't even known there *was* an H-weaving yahoo list; but then I'm more recently back to weaving after a few decades' absence. I've kept the inkle going, and have a Gilmore X-frame 36" 4H loom parked out on long-term loan with a friend, a 40" Norwood 4H cherrywood loom just waiting to be strung up with some table linens, an older Glimåkra table loom with 4 levers, a Beka 20" rigid heddle frame loom that my mom sent along out of her stash, and that Ashford inkle that stays busy with useful items. I've also fallen in with Enabling spinners, and have not one but two loaner wheels and a regular Monday-evening session, a couple of drop spindles, the light top-whorl being my current fave (a person can get lace-weight on this thing!)
Ranvaig, I'm looking forward to hearing more about your daughter's inkle belt (her first inkling?)
I belonged to the SCA decades ago, and while life's too busy any more, have a great fondness for the Society, especially in terms of the arts & sciences it fosters. I've also worked RenFests and the Renaissance Faires; the folks who come together to put on a show that size make a splendid community. Some handwoven wares for Dickens Faire garb lurk in my hind-brain and thus in my future, I'm certain.

Posted on Sat, 05/23/2009 - 01:11

W00T!!! We gots replies! 8-D

Uh...anytime you feel the need to divest yourself of that Norwood, I probably could find space for it. ;-) Seriously though, I'm holding out for a Gilmore Gem or Gem II, as I could really use both a sampling loom and an 8-shaft loom.

I'm an enabler too--two of my friends now own wheels, multiple spindles, and one just got a nice little Leclerc 4H table loom and stand, so she's quickly becoming a weaver.

If you worked at RPFN or Heart of the Forest Faire in the past 15 years, we've probably run into each other at some point.

Posted on Sat, 05/30/2009 - 04:03

 Hi,

Dawn, you've met me before.....

I tend to weave modern stuff at home, but I'm a docent at Sutter's Fort in Sacramento, where I'm often doing spinning and weaving related things.  (I haven't been lately, I had a bout with bursitius and it hurt to even climb over the bench to get to the loom, especially in 1840's clothing.)

I do have a historical project in my plans, some linsey woolsey yardage to make an apron with.  I have most of the wool spun, and I've dyed some linen with indigo.....

Posted on Tue, 06/09/2009 - 01:03

Hi everyone, great to see more SCA and other historical weavers!  I do mostly tablet weaving for sale but lately I've been experimenting with Viking Twills on my Baby Wolf loom.  I've also done some inkle weaving, in fact I do most of my tablet weaving on an inkle loom, but I'm really enjoying my floor loom.  I also have a 4 shaft table loom, but I don't get as many chance to use it.  But I'm looking forward to seeing what everyone's doing.

Posted on Tue, 06/09/2009 - 02:17

Hello, another SCA-person here (Drachenwald). I used to be quite active in the SCA before, but now I only attend 1 or 2 events per year. I've become more and more obsessed with clothing my family in handwoven garb, it's a slow process, but fun.

Before I started weaving more seriously on my floor loom, I wove tablet-weaving quite a lot. I like complex patterns, but since my daughter was born, it's hard to find the concentration needed (not to mention how upset I got when she found one of my weavings, and played with it!)

Besides my Viking/mediaeval interest, I also have a "thing" for 19th century history, and textiles, but I have so much to learn in that field. I'm sure you all will enlighten me :)

Posted on Tue, 06/09/2009 - 04:55

 Hello all, I'm a Roman 1st century C.E. re-enactor and a 20 year plus SCA member. My fine husband built a warp weighted loom for me, only one warp put on it so far but it is linen, and I demoed for three months worth of weekends at a  museum. I have a unbranded 8H floor loom and a 8H Dorothy table loom in storage waiting for TLC to bring them back to working condition; an inkle loom that stays fairly busy and have done backstrap band weaving, including a peculiar Irish variant described as weaving on your toe. Tablet weaving keeps calling me back, like a siren. On a later historical note, I make bobbin lace.  Enablers seem to be common here, I've gotten a couple of friends seriously hooked on spinning, both with spindle and wheel.

 

Looking forward to learning together! 

Posted on Wed, 06/10/2009 - 19:55

I'm Jahanarabanu Vivana in the SCA, yep I use my SCA name for all my online stuff. I have a 7th Century Persian persona, sometimes known in Drachenwald as the worst Viking persona ever, haha!

I have been in the SCA for 14 years, and that sounds so crazy to say! I'm in Drachenwald now (for the past 5 years), Calontir before that. I am best know for the fact that I have about 20 looms, most of them small looms. I've been weaving since I was about 12, my mom taught me and some day I'll get to ship her looms over here.

I am currently house shopping and the two main considerations are the size of the fenced yard for my dog, and which house in my price range has the best weaving studio space!

I've been looking forward to Weavolution for about 6 months and am so glad we're all finally here!

Posted on Fri, 06/26/2009 - 01:09

Hi,

In SCA I am Leofwyn Weaver; in the 18th century I am often Dinah the Runaway Indentured Servant. I also sell fabrics at TimeTravelTextiles.com, and sometimes in person at events. I've recently been working on doublewave linen tapes for 18th century, and am about to try weaving some twill winingas for 9th/10th century.

I also just kidnapped a 52" counterbalance loom from craigslist. It's in pieces in my car. i want to refurbish it to use for demos; over time I want to replace components with more period-authentic ones, and if I'm still weaving when that's done, I want to build a loom that's another step closer to authenticity, using what I've learned from making parts for this one. Though today it seems like I'm more likely to be replacing the weaver first.

Anyway I hope that I can get the hang of Weavolution; I never really acclimatized to yahoo groups. ;-)

 

Posted on Sun, 07/05/2009 - 13:17

Hi folks!

  I weave on an unknown, cobbled together four shaft counterbalance loom.  I'm attempting a 9 yard warp, thirty inches wide with 10/2 cotton at the moment.  I missed the lesson on warping, being mostly self taught.  I've taken several workshops in the past couple of years, learning such cool things as Swedish towel weaving, four shaft diversification, shaft switch rug technique, and Acadian style weaving.  Still missed the warping lesson.  I want to make a pair of pants for my husband, and a shirt for myself out of the fabric, which will weave just fine if I ever get it warped.  It will be warped for huck lace, and I'll try some of the variations that I learned from Robyn Spady's workshop "extreme warp makeover".

  At Black Sheep Gathering last month, I purchased a Glimakra band loom.  This is the type that you sit sideways to the loom for weaving.  It can be set up as an inkle, or a counterbalance loom.  I set up the counterbalance.  I can weave a  band very quickly on this loom!  I'm making seam binding for the above.

  Although I'm not involved in any historical reinactment, I'm very interested in weaving throughout history. 

Aunt Janet

Posted on Sat, 07/11/2009 - 13:37

Hi !!  I have a 1949 Sears 6-harness loom and a couple old inkle looms and a Baby wolf which I use most. My interest is mostly Shaker weaves and early fine threads. I also knit and have been really interested in how knitting has been influenced by different groups.I build a warp weighted loom a number of years ago but find it hard to use as I get older!!

Mary

Posted on Tue, 07/28/2009 - 18:31

Greetings,  I'm Robert Schweitzer (aka Rufus in the SCA).  I started weaving almost 2 decades ago after a friend took out Collingwood's book from the library and said  - "Let's try this!".

So I am first and foremost a tablet weaver, although I've done a tiny amount of work on a table loom and jack loom.

If you have looked in the projects recently, you will have seen my historical reconstruction of an ethiopian curtain.  I'm really more into the Norse brocades, but as a tablet weaver, how could I not be intrigued by the prospect of creating a 6 x 12 foot piece.  Especially when one of them is in the same city as me (under storage at the ROM and they haven't let me look at it yet - grrrr).

This is the second historical reconstruction for me.  The first was recreating a band from the grave of the bishop of cantelupe.  The ROM let me look at this one under a microscope to plot the pattern.  The pattern took 144 cards and then after I wove about 6 inches, Nancy Spies and Peter Collingwood informed me that the piece wasn't actually tablet weaving, that it was a warp faced pick up of some kind.  (they were looking at the other half of the piece in the british museum)  Kind of hard to argue with that sort of authority.

That all took place about 15 years ago, and I've learned a lot since then, but I would love a thread on identifying different weaving techniques in artifacts.  Weavolution is the ideal setting for that sort of thread since most techniques are represented.

Posted on Fri, 08/14/2009 - 20:12

Hello!  Just discovering Weavolution!  I'm an 18th c. reenactor (Rev War) and have (and use) several old looms including a ca 1800 barn frame loom that has been retrofitted with a 6H countermarch system.  I occasionally help out in the Education Department at the American Textile History Museum in Lowell MA, and love demonstrating and teaching people to weave and spin.  As the director of a local history museum, I'm fascinated by pretty much anything old - good thing, eh?   

Posted on Fri, 09/11/2009 - 18:11

Hi, I'm Careena. I was a Jr Docent at the Colonial Complex for the York County Heritage Trust (York PA) this summer. I loved it to death! The loom they had for demos looked alot like a Wolf Pup. The second week I was there, they pulled somebody down from the board to warp it. Apparently she hadn't woven for a long time. You would've loved how they were warping it. Pulled one string out at a time (8/2 Unmercerized) and measured it against the next one, they didn't even know how long it was. I didn't want to "intrude" because I thought she knew what she was doing. She looked at me and said, "We need 240 of these." "You know, there is a warping board in there," I said. "You want to use it, go ahead." I don't know how else she expected me to do it. I wound off a bunch and handed them to her. She proceeded to cut off the thrums I used to keep them together and pulled out one string far enough to give herself room to work. She out it through the reed, through the heddle, and pulled it out the back, draping it over the back beam. I let her do 40 ends that way, then offered to "show her how I do it." Fortunatly, she figured I did ok and let me take over. I've kind of been in charge of the loom ever since.

One of the buildings the Trust owns is a log house who's owner was a jaquard coverlet weaver in the early to mid 1800s (he built the house in 1812). None of the docents knew much about jacquard looms and the topic was sadly overlooked, sometimes being called a Jack Card loom. In July, I went out to the National Museum of the American Coverlet and found out more. I came back and that was my strong point. I insisted on tagging along on the other docents tours to explain.

My own loom is from the 1940s and is still going strong. It's one of the few things they "make like they used to."

And in case you were wondering, I had to pull out the 40 ends the lady from the Trust warped, because they were so incredibly tangled, even my older sister couldn't save them.

Careena

Posted on Fri, 09/11/2009 - 23:31

Hi all (wave!)

I'm hoping you can point me in the right direction.

I'm interested in two time periods.

Israel 1st century CE, I've read the Bible many times and I'm interested in what kind of fabric the apostle Paul would have used to make tents. Also surrounding regions like Persia, Egypt, etc.

Early California, pre-colonial to early 1800s.

Any clues to where to begin research would be appreciated.

Have a good day!

Franco Rios

Posted on Sat, 09/12/2009 - 05:30

 Franco-  what are you looking for about early CA?  Most goods were actually imported into the state, but some missions and forts had small "factories" too.

The native Californians did have a weaving culture in basket weaving.  If you go to the Indian Museum by Sutter's Fort you can see some and they can answer some questions.  I'll be at the fort tomorrow, but we'll be teaching parents very basic weaving and spinning for ELP so we won't be able to talk to the general public.

Posted on Sat, 09/12/2009 - 05:39

I guess I'm interested in whatever was being woven in early Calif. for cloth or blankets. I'm thinking that once the Spanish sheep arrive that wool is harvested and spun somewhere!

I've been looking at the basket weaving to find examples of animal patterns, like rabbit patterns! I found a couple that I liked enough to try when I get some time for them.

Have a good day at Sutters Fort tomorrow. Drink plenty of water.

Franco Rios

Posted on Sat, 09/12/2009 - 06:19

 Yes, the little bit of weaving that was being done was because of the flocks of sheep.  Sutter even has notes in his papers about crossing his sheep with a merino ram to improve the wool.  There was blanket weaving going on at the fort.  (this would have been in the 1840's)

My grandpa used to use the basket patterns to piece together in wood and then he'd turn them into bowls, vases and boxes.

I'm hoping to be able to take off about 12:30-1:00.  I just stuck some gatorade in the fridge to bring.  It was gorgeous Wednesday evening there, so why did it have to heat up?

Posted on Sun, 04/11/2010 - 19:39

I'm new here, I'll introduce myself.  I teach weaving and have done historic weaving and interpretation at historic sites in Virginia.  I'm not a production weaver, but I enjoy examining old textiles and figuring out how and why they were done. 

My last weave analysis was a four-shaft barleycorn that used fine warps and a fine weft "tabby" alternated with a very thick pattern pick.  The original was probably from the 1890's and was a white on white crib coverlet.  I re-created it as samples for my weaving guild using 20/2 cotton and Lily Sugar and Cream.

I'm just glad I can now weave in my blue jeans at home instead of that silly mob-cap! 

 

Posted on Fri, 07/09/2010 - 12:17

Hi - I just discovered your posting.  I am also interested in Shaker weaves and would love to learn more about them.   I am going to be warping my Norwood with linen for the first time this week.  I just was able to add the additional 4 harnesses to make it an 8 harness and that was quite an adventure!   What resources would you recommend for learning more about the Shaker textiles?    

donna