Julia: counterbalance or countermarche?

I am considering a Julia, either counterbalance or countermarche. I'm not an experienced weaver so I don't know if I'd fully appreciate a countermarche. I want a very solid, sturdy, little loom! Sturdy, solid, and ease of treadling/beating are my priorities. I'd like to weave table linens  and also weave with my handspun Cotswold. What is everyone's advice? Should I go "whole hog" and do the countermarche thing even if I'm a novice weaver? Also, the Julia looks like it has a higher front beam, more "normal" heightin general, than the Toika Lila. Any thoughts on the two? I wish I could test drive one but no one around here has either type. I'd appreciate everyone's thoughts before I buy one sight unseen.

Comments

Posted on Wed, 03/07/2018 - 23:09

Breast beam height is 32 inches and yes, this is taller and gives more leg space.

Contact Glimakra USA.  They can answer your questions.

Joanne

 

Posted on Sat, 03/10/2018 - 01:47

Countermarche has more cords to tie up, but gives you greater patterning capability because the shafts move independently (CB shafts move in pairs).  While CB looms with more than 4 shafts are possible, they are uncommon, and tend to be difficult to get a good shed from.  Take a look at pattern books and see what you want to do;  if 8 shaft patterns call to you, go CM.  If you think you will be happy with 4 shaft patterns and balanced (2 up 2 down) weaves, go CB.  Some CB looms do 1 against 3 well, some don't.  The reason that jack looms are popular is that they are easy to tie up, and all shafts move independantly, giving great pattering capability.  They are more limited in the types of fabrics they do well.

Posted on Sat, 03/10/2018 - 01:48

Countermarche has more cords to tie up, but gives you greater patterning capability because the shafts move independently (CB shafts move in pairs).  While CB looms with more than 4 shafts are possible, they are uncommon, and tend to be difficult to get a good shed from.  Take a look at pattern books and see what you want to do;  if 8 shaft patterns call to you, go CM.  If you think you will be happy with 4 shaft patterns and balanced (2 up 2 down) weaves, go CB.  Some CB looms do 1 against 3 well, some don't.  The reason that jack looms are popular is that they are easy to tie up, and all shafts move independantly, giving great pattering capability.  They are more limited in the types of fabrics they do well.

Posted on Sat, 03/10/2018 - 01:58

For 4 shaft weaves (or less) I love CB looms. And weave unbalanced weaves just fine, since the horses allow more independent movement. You can also add another harness (set of shafts) and do skillbragd/smalandsvav, or simply put on long eyed heddles and do things like damask pick up. I bought a used cm system for my cb loom and rarely use it. You can always start with a cb system and add cm later if you like.

Posted on Sat, 03/10/2018 - 02:12

For 4 shaft weaves (or less) I love CB looms. And weave unbalanced weaves just fine, since the horses allow more independent movement. You can also add another harness (set of shafts) and do skillbragd/smalandsvav, or simply put on long eyed heddles and do things like damask pick up. I bought a used cm system for my cb loom and rarely use it. You can always start with a cb system and add cm later if you like.

Posted on Sat, 03/10/2018 - 14:42

Looms designed for CM are taller to accomadate the second set of lamms.  You may or may not be able to change a CB to CM.  As I said, some CB looms do 1 X 3 well, some don't.  ShawnC's loom apparently does it well, but if unbalanced tie weaves appeal to you (like 1/3 twill or lace) a CM or jack loom is a more dependable choice.

Posted on Mon, 03/12/2018 - 02:21

When a loom can be ordered countermarch or counterbalance, the counterbalance choice is less expensive.  Some may purchase it thinking that it would be easier to tie up the counterbalance, but usually the cost is the reason for the choice.

Joanne