Glimakra loom help from Glimakra in Montana, USA

We at Glimakra can answer your questions about new or used looms.   Glimakra looms have not changed much over time, but even
experienced weavers who have had their Glimakra loom a long time may
have questions about their loom and attachments.  Some weavers want to add shafts and treadles.  Some older looms may need parts or
new heddles, tie-up cord or a countermarch added.  And we get a lot of
questions about adding a drawloom to their Glimakra Standard or Ideal
looms.   

I have been teaching weaving for over 40 years and have woven on many different types of looms over the years.  So, I am very familiar with most types of looms. We have information on our website for those who purchase new or used counterbalance and countermarch looms. So, if you have questions about barn frame looms, looms from other companies or just general questions, just ask. 

Joanne

Comments

Posted on Fri, 08/02/2013 - 05:10

How do I determine if my Glimakra loom has the right length heddles? I suspect that mine are a bit too long.

Thanks,
Janene

Posted on Fri, 08/02/2013 - 12:43

In the 70s, the hand tied heddles sent with the Glimakra Standard and Ideal looms were 10 1/2 inches long.  This size will give you a shed which is large enough for just about any shuttle.  When Texsolv was developed in 1979, the factory recommended the 11 inch heddles.  That is the size we send today.  However, in the 80s some weavers experimented with using longer heddles, up to 13 inches long in an attempt to get a larger shed.  A larger shed is not necessary, as the shed is large enough with the 11 inch heddles.  13 inch heddles can keep the shed from opening fully and actually give you a smaller shed.   The bottom heddle bar will be an inch lower at rest and will be stopped by the side frame when opening a shed, essentially keeping the shed from opening fully. 

These longer heddles can be used, but you must be very exacting with the tie-up.  You will need to tie the treadles as low as possible to be able to fully open the shed.  If the treadles are too high, the lower lamms can bump against the treadles when you open a shed, stopping the shed from opening fully.  You will also need to tie up the upper lamms higher to keep them from bumping against the lower lamms.

To measure the heddles, stretch them straight on a table.  The 11 inch heddles will measure 10 1/2 inches when on the wooden heddle bars, due to the thickness of the bars.

Joanne

 

Posted on Thu, 01/10/2019 - 20:17

My older Standard loom had 10 1/2 inch heddles on it. So when I went to order some additional Texsolv heddles I ordered 10 1/2 inch. It is too late to return these. Do you think they will work? Or should I just order all new 11" Texsolv heddles for my loom?

Thanks for your input.

Kay

Posted on Thu, 01/10/2019 - 20:18

My older Standard loom had 10 1/2 inch heddles on it. So when I went to order some additional Texsolv heddles I ordered 10 1/2 inch. It is too late to return these. Do you think they will work? Or should I just order all new 11" Texsolv heddles for my loom?

Thanks for your input.

Kay

Posted on Wed, 09/04/2013 - 01:17

I am having a hard time getting my counterbalance loom set up - do you have access to documentation that describes how to set up then tie up the loom? I have the main pieces together, but am stalled with the treddles / harnesses / etc. 

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Posted on Wed, 09/04/2013 - 01:17

I am having a hard time getting my counterbalance loom set up - do you have access to documentation that describes how to set up then tie up the loom? I have the main pieces together, but am stalled with the treddles / harnesses / etc. 

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Posted on Wed, 09/04/2013 - 01:28

We have information on our website.  If you go to the home page and click on the top item on the vertical menu on the left, Learning about Looms, then click on the top item on the next page, Basic info, then you will get to four files.  The first is 9 pages of basic set up information.  The second file gives specific information about the counterbalance tie-up. 

Or, click on this:
http://glimakrausa.com/learning-looms-weaving/intro-to-countermarch-and-...

Joanne

Posted on Wed, 09/18/2013 - 12:33

Might have found a Glim that will suit my needs...Question:  It's an older 135cm  8H/10T...I figure it will need new long lamms and how difficult will it be to turn this into a 10H/10T....or can it be made into a 12H/12T....it's a horizonal CM.

Posted on Wed, 09/18/2013 - 17:55

Hi jlread,

Yes, all Standard looms can have shafts and treadles added up to 10x10.  You can go to 12x12, but you might need a few extra parts for that.  Yes, if it is a loom from the 70s, you use the lamms you have for the upper lamms and order all your new lamms as lower lamms.  Also, look at the countermarch.  You may need to add more jacks for the shafts you are adding.

Joanne

Posted on Fri, 09/20/2013 - 11:12

If I have 8 sets of jacks in a CM...and want to add 4 more...do I just get different pins?....I can't find jacks in your pricelist...are they priced by the set?

Posted on Fri, 09/27/2013 - 09:56

I have a Glimakra standard and love it! The only thing that troubles me is the squeaking noise that seems to be coming from the beater where it pivots at the top. Everytime I move it forward and backwards it squeaks.  Is there something I can do to eliminate the squeaking? 

Posted on Fri, 09/27/2013 - 19:28

Is it rubbing someplace? or something need tightening in the frame of the beater? Is the loom square? Something has to rub to squeek. The pivots shouldn't really rub, they roll.

Posted on Fri, 09/27/2013 - 23:25

Finally....the happy and proud owner of a 'new to me' Glimakra...She's in practically pristine condition.....

Posted on Sat, 09/28/2013 - 00:06

Jellybelly, a little bit of candle wax or paraffin where the beater pivots should eliminate the squeak.

Posted on Mon, 09/30/2013 - 02:33

Thanks Karen for answering.

I just got back from teaching in Colorado. I taught three classes, two on tapestry and one on Swedish weaves.  It was a nice trip and the weavers were all very good weavers.

Yes, the wax works perfectly where wood rubs on wood.

Joanne

Posted on Fri, 10/18/2013 - 10:22

I was just reading the loom site, in particular about the wood and how it's used. Quite informative write-up. Nice to read the little details. :) On the site, I assumed the figures for specific gravity and weight are for moisture content @12 % moisture content (MC). These are 'empirical' figures often quoted from the USDA 'Wood Handbook' or Wood technology books authored by Hoadley and from Panshin and Zeeuw. Didn't notice if MC % was mentioned. Also, the birch being compared, seems like white birch (I see bark). It is probably the most abundant of all birches in the north. However, we have a much denser birch also used in furniture making here in Canada and north eastern US. It is often substituted for black cherry. It is yellow birch (similar in properties to black birch, also native). It has a weight of 43 lbs/cu ft and sp. gr. of 0.62 @ 12 %. Nice wood to work with. It is important to realize that moisture content changes wood properties. Also, birches are indistinguishable by wood grain. However, yellow birch is similar to hard maple (sugar and black) in weight and density @12 % MC.

Always glad to talk wood. :)

 

Posted on Tue, 11/19/2013 - 20:50

Hello, I am new to this group. I bought a standard this summer with 12 shafts and 1,50 m width. I have added the flying shuttle and it all seems to work out just fine. My question is: how do I thread the fly shuttle? I searched you tube and Google, but found no clue. I inserted the pirn, hooked the thread over the hook at the top, but which of the 3 holes in the side should I use? Why are there 3 holes anyway?
Thans a lot, Sandra

Posted on Tue, 11/19/2013 - 21:10

Start by threading the shuttle so that there is the least amount of tension put on the thread.  After weaving an inch or so, if you find that too much thread comes out of the shuttle, rethread to produce a little more tension.  Then try weaving again.  On my fly shuttle, which is on a wider loom, I thread the shuttle with no added tension.

Joanne

Posted on Wed, 11/20/2013 - 09:28

Tension is probably based on friction, so if there is a device that tightens against the yarn or the path of the yarn can be changed then tension on the yarn changes.

Posted on Wed, 11/20/2013 - 11:38

Choose the hole which gives the least resistence or tension.  Shuttles have changed over the years, so you will need to experiment.

Joanne

Posted on Sun, 11/24/2013 - 02:00

I rub a bit of beeswax on the points where the beater hangs in the grooves. I live on the Atlantic shore and, depending on the season and weather (humidity), I have to do this periodically. And use beeswax. Other waxes and/or soap (a commonly suggested remedy) can absorb moisture. 

Posted on Sun, 11/24/2013 - 15:28

This is the third warp on my 47" Standard. The first two held tension fine but this one is giving me problems. When I try to get good tension on the warp by tightening the warp beam ratchet, the front ratchet slips to the next tooth. I'm not sure what to look for to correct this. Advice, suggestions very welcome! Thanks.

Posted on Sun, 11/24/2013 - 16:05

Did you wind the warp around the beams in the correct direction?  You always wind on clockwise.

Joanne

Joanne

Posted on Sun, 11/24/2013 - 17:35

Thanks. Just checked warp beam is wound clockwise.

ETA. Cloth beam is going counter-clockwise. That could be the problem. Since I only have about a yard left on this warp I'll keep going but will make sure next warp is clockwise. Thanks again!

Posted on Sun, 11/24/2013 - 18:55

It is nice to know that the loom will work even if the beam is wound the wrong direction.

Joanne

Posted on Wed, 01/01/2014 - 23:01

Hello,

I finally got the stand for my Emilia 19 inch but am struggling with the loom bouncing all over the place when I beat, even gently.  I also find that when I move the heddle to the up and down positions the stand will lift up and make it difficult to position.  What are your suggestions ?

Thank you ,

Peggy 

Posted on Thu, 01/02/2014 - 21:35

Hi Peggy,

The cross bar on the bottom of the stand is used as a foot rest.  Resting your foot on it will stabilize the loom.  Rigid heddle looms are very light weight, so they will move if you beat hard.  For a scarf or a narrow warp, you don't beat.  You just set the yarn in place.  When weaving a wide warp or something that requires a tight weave, it can be hard to use the heddle as a beater.  So, to get a tight weave, you can use the shuttle as a batten.  If you are using a boat shuttle or some other shuttle for the weft, use the stick shuttle that came with the loom as a batten.  Put it into the shed and pull it down against the weft to tighten the weft.  If you only have the shuttle which came with the loom, wind the weft on one edge of the shuttle with a figure 8 winding, leaving the other long edge without yarn.  That edge is used to tighten the weft.

Joanne

Posted on Fri, 01/03/2014 - 13:15

I am a novice weaver who recently purchased a used Glimakra loom.  I have maintained the universal tie-up that was on the loom with some adjustments. I have gotten a clear shed, but something is still wrong.  I have no one to ask since the other weavers in the area are not countermarche users. Here are my questions:

1. The upper lamms are going up into the shafts. Is this normal and if not, how do I adjust?

2. My heddles seem to scrunch up as I change sheds (likely from hitting the lamms). Then they cross over each other at the top getting the knots crossed. I feel certain this is not correct.

3. Although my treadles are higher than described in my books and on videos, they are adjusted for a clear shed and my feet reach them as I sit on the bench with my forearms on the beam.  Does the height of the treadle matter?

4. I have my loom warped with 8/2 cotton to complete the first project in "The Big Book of Weaving".  My boat shuttle flies right between the threads and onto the floor!  How a 2 -inch thick device can so easily fall through an 1/8 inch slot is bewildering!  Should my bottom shed be against the bottom of the beater bar? Or should the warp not touch the beater bar?

If you could give me some advice on how to adjust the tie-up that would be a great start! Although the shed looks good, the inner workings don't seem right!

Many thanks!

Carol

Posted on Fri, 01/03/2014 - 21:37

One or two things could be happening, the treadles are too heigh so the range of motion is increased with the treadles and lamms. Look at the heddles, and measure how far between the eye and the shaft bar the distance is (upper or lower, doesn't matter). You do not need the treadles tied up any higher, than this length, from the floor. Additional height will cause added wear on the heddles and the yarn. And the yarn may be rubbing on the beater when returning to rest position when closest to the harnass, when the shed it open.

The second thing could be that the upper lamms are tied up too high and hitting the lower shaft bars and or the lower lamms. I leave the lower lamms level and I keep in mind the heddle eye distance again when tying up.

Also make sure the cords that hold the shafts and any unused heddles out on the ends of the shafts are not tangling between other shafts. There should be a cord applied on the top and botton shaft bars to make the heddles stay on the bars (page 201 of your book). If there is an extra tail on the overhead shaft cords, turn the tail up and insert the end into an eye in the texsolv cord so it won't get caught in the heddles when the shafts move past one another.

Some drafts are not balanced that well, so you may find that the more forward shafts hang a little different than the back ones. You will have to adjust the cords or simply weight the shafts with eleastic cord or something. I find I can just adjust the cords and everything works out for me.

I've never had a hand shuttle ever fall through a warp, makes me wonder if there sufficient tension. Now a fly shuttle I have, because it is a heavier beast. But that is not very common either.

I am using a home made version of the 'Standard'.

Posted on Fri, 01/03/2014 - 20:58

Hi Carol,

Reedguy has given you some very good advice.  The Glimakra looms can give you good sheds and still one can improve on the tie-up for comfort or for ease of weaving.  Reedguy is right, you may need to tighten your warp threads if the shuttle is falling through the warp.  And yes, you may also be more comfortable and find the sheds better if your treadles sit below the foor rest.

If your loom is more than 30 years old, you may have lower lamms which need to be heavier.   In l982, the lower lamms were made heavier and longer, which gives a better balance.  I have instructions on our website for compensating for this.  This will also keep the heddles from migrating as you describe.

On the home page, www.glimakrausa.com

click on Learning about Looms, then click on basic loom info.  It is in the third file.  The other files might also be helpful to you.

Let us know if you need more help.

Joanne

 

Posted on Fri, 01/03/2014 - 22:35

Thank you for the help. I will try not beating the scarf with the heddle. That is a great idea using the shuttle as a batten, I will try it. Since my legs are so short and I can't reach the cross bar, I will try a shorter chair. I love the process, I just need to figure it out.

Posted on Fri, 01/03/2014 - 22:55

I have a friend who is 5 feet tall.  I will set up a loom on the stand and work with her to see what we can determine would be good to suggest to you.  It will be a few days, but I will try this.

Joanne

Posted on Sat, 01/04/2014 - 15:40

Thanks to you and Reedguy for your help. I will be redoing my loom later today....so before I start...,I have a few more questions. I have my loom tied up following the directions of Madelyn Van Der Hoogt's article. I also have the Big Book of Weaving....with the traditional tie-up. Consequently, I am confused on what is different due to the tie-up method and what is just plain wrong. So here are some of my questions:

1. When the loom is at rest, without jack pins and shaft holders, should the shafts and lamms be even with each other?

2. The Madelyn directions say that the upper lamms should be 1.5-2.5 inches from the bottom of the shaft. So at rest, the upper lams should slant at an angle ending at around 2 inches below the shafts. Is this correct?

3. With the current tie-up the lower lamms are also at an angle parellel to the upper lamms. Is this correct or should they be parallel to the floor? The photos show parellel to the upper lammns.

4. My treadles are currently too high, I can see that, so before I re-tie, should they be parallel to the floor or at an increasing height from 7-9 inches as in Madelyn's article? Reedguy, you said they should be the same distance as the heddle eye to shaft bar, which is about 4.5 inches. Should all the treadles be at this height or should they slope?

5. If the loom is tied up correctly, does the universal tie-up look different from the traditional tie-up? In other words, other than the way the cords look, should the lamms, shafts, and treadles look similar in photos and drawings regardless of the cording?

5. If I am using only 4 shafts, do I leave the other 4 unused shafts tied-up with the heddles pushed to the side, which is what I have currently done?

6. Where on my loom would I find the model# and or date of production, so that I can determine if it is pre-1980's. I don't think it is....because it is in good shape.

If you could answer these questions, I think I would have a better understanding of what is important as a starting point and then I can tweak from there.

Again, many thanks for your time and expertise.

Carol

Posted on Wed, 01/08/2014 - 23:00

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Thanks to you and Reedguy for your help. I will be redoing my loom
soon....so before I start...,I have a few more questions. I have my
loom tied up following the directions of Madelyn Van Der Hoogt's
article. I also have the Big Book of Weaving....with the traditional
tie-up. Consequently, I am confused on what is different due to the
tie-up method and what is just plain wrong. So here are some of my
questions:

1. When the loom is at rest, without jack pins and shaft holders,
should the shafts and lamms be even with each other?

2. The Madelyn directions say that the upper lamms should be
1.5-2.5 inches from the bottom of the shaft. So at rest, the upper
lams should slant at an angle ending at around 2 inches below the
shafts. Is this correct?

3. With the current tie-up the lower lamms are also at an angle
parallel to the upper lamms. Is this correct or should they be
parallel to the floor? The photos show parallel to the upper lammns.

4. My treadles are currently too high, I can see that, so before I
re-tie, should they be parallel to the floor or at an increasing
height from 7-9 inches as in Madelyn's article? Reedguy, you said
they should be the same distance as the heddle eye to shaft bar,
which is about 4.5 inches. Should all the treadles be at this height
or should they slope?

5. If the loom is tied up correctly, does the universal tie-up
look different from the traditional tie-up? In other words, other
than the way the cords look, should the lamms, shafts, and treadles
look similar in photos and drawings regardless of the cording?

5. If I am using only 4 shafts, do I leave the other 4 unused
shafts tied-up with the heddles pushed to the side, which is what I
have currently done?

6. Where on my loom would I find the model# and or date of
production, so that I can determine if it is pre-1980's. I don't
think it is....because it is in good shape.

If you could answer these questions, I think I would have a better
understanding of what is important as a starting point and then I can
tweak from there.

Again, many thanks for your time and expertise.

Posted on Wed, 01/08/2014 - 23:25

The answers to your questions depend on these:

What is the length of your heddles?  The correct length is 11 inches, measured off the loom knot to knot or 10 1/2 inches measured when on the shaft bars.

What is the length of your lower lamms and the weaving width of your loom.  The lower lamms should be approx the same length as your weaving width.  The weaving width is the measurement of the length of the octagonal part of the warp or cloth beam.

Let me know and I will then be able to answer your questions.

Joanne

 

 

Posted on Thu, 01/09/2014 - 00:55

You should base your tie-up on your heddles (eye to shaft bar). If your treadles are higher off the floor than this and your upper lamm tie-up distance to the lower shaft bars is short, you will have collisions and increased wear on heddles. I always leave my lower lamms level or very very slightly upward and I never touch the jack pulley cords on those once my loom is set up initially. They are set for life so to speak. ;) Your treadles will not be perfectly even on all drafts simply because some drafts will require more warp ends on some shafts than others, so they (shafts) could very 1/2" - or better up or down when at rest. Usually they stay were they are on mine when I first pull the jack pin out. Only when you start treadling do they change a little adjusting to their load from the yarn. There is always lamm tie-up adjustments to tweek the shed.

Myself, I am not familiar with the Universal tie-up. So I cannot comment there.

As far as the unused shafts, you could just tie a cord from the unused treadle to the upper lamm bar and move the heddles to the side, yes. However the jack cords down to the upper shaft bars would inhibit moving them all the way over. But putting the craddle blocks in place, the shaft pins in and the jack locking pin in you could temporarily untie the jack cords to move the heddles over then put the jack cords back on. This will all keep the lamms of the unused shafts from colliding and interfering with the 4 in use.

 

The reason I am always tying up my upper lamms is I unhook my harnass from all cords and take it to the back with the craddle blocks to thread the heddles. So I have my bench seat inside the loom, I have my warp wound and spread in the lease sticks and I just draw an end in sequence with the lease order to thread the heddles.

Joanne can help you more than I as your loom is an actual Glamakra and mine is not, just similar.

Posted on Fri, 01/10/2014 - 03:38

Well, my pal, a 63" standard, needs a name. I am trying to also develop a name for my studio for marketing purposes. Do you name your Glimakra looms, and if so, what is special about naming an individual Glimarka?
Dakota

Posted on Fri, 01/10/2014 - 08:48

According to Tillhagen: Vävskrock (ISBN 91-36-02510-0) (approx "weaving superstitions") it was tradition to give looms surnames that somewhat related to the loom structure - Ramström is an example mentioned. Ram = frame, ström = stream (not relevant to the loom itself, but a common ending in Swe surnames). Also, he writes, looms were seen as male.

OTOH, traditions are there to be broken, yes?

Posted on Fri, 01/10/2014 - 12:57

Joanne:  The heddles are 10 1/2 inches on the shafts.  The lamms and the beams are both around 43 inches. 

Thanks to both you and Reed guy for providing me with assistance....little by little I'll get it. 

Posted on Fri, 01/10/2014 - 16:34

cgwilliams,

Your heddles are the right length.  The article written by Madelyn is appropriate if your heddles are two inches too long.  In the 80s and early 90s, some looms were shipped with longer heddles, as the customer may have chosen a longer heddle.  However this complicates the tie-up and Madelyn's instructions are good if that is your problem.

With 11 inch heddles, you do not need to tie up the upper lamms as high, although on the Standard loom, you can tie them up a little higher than parallel.

If your beam and the lower lamms are 43 inches long, then you have a 110cm loom, which is a fraction more than 43 inches.  If the lower lamms are also this long, this is very good.  Then your upper lamms are shorter than this by about a foot.   If I missunderstood, do let me know.

Either the loom is a newer one (since 1982), or these have been replaced by someone.  

Your tie-up should go well.  I will answer your questions in a separate message.

Joanne

 

 

Posted on Fri, 01/10/2014 - 16:40

1. When the loom is at rest, without jack pins and shaft holders,
should the shafts and lamms be even with each other?

If you have a warp on the loom and the locking pins are in the countermarch and/or the shaft holders are holding the shaft bars, then yes, the shafts are all the same height and the lamms match each other in height.  However, if you don't have a warp on the loom and you pull out the locking pins, there is no way to predict what will happen with the shafts and lamms.  And since tie-ups are done with a warp on the loom, you should not worry about this.

So, before I answer the other questions, please tell me if you have a warp on the loom.  The warp also needs to be tied up and the warp tension tight for starting to weave.

6. Where on my loom would I find the model# and or date of
production, so that I can determine if it is pre-1980's. I don't
think it is....because it is in good shape.

The model numbers were used for only a short time and I don't know how they work.  But if the lower part of your beater has two bolts on each side, it was made after 1982.

Joanne

Posted on Fri, 01/10/2014 - 20:11

Hi Tom,

Do you have the older (like l980s) Glimakra single unit drawloom?

Joanne

Posted on Sat, 01/11/2014 - 00:06

More answers to questions.  More to come in a separate message.

 

2. The Madelyn directions say that the upper lamms should be
1.5-2.5 inches from the bottom of the shaft. So at rest, the upper
lams should slant at an angle ending at around 2 inches below the
shafts. Is this correct?

 

Madelyn wrote this as a tie-up for when the heddles are too long, usually two inches longer.  That means that you have lost some space for the movement of the lamms and the lamms will move further.  This complicates the tie-up. And where the lamm is a lot higher, those cords would need to be longer.  This also complicates the tie-up.

 

With the Standard loom and 11 inch heddles, the upper lamms can be tied a little higher than parallel, but there is no need to tie them more than an inch higher than what parallel would be.  On the treadle tie up page of my book I have a diagram for how to determine the heights for the two sets of lamms.  Since there are many different types of countermarch looms, this diagram gives you the concept, not the measurements.  Basically it tell you to look at the distances of the spaces between each moving part.  There are 3 spaces: one is between the lower shaft bars and the upper lamms, the second is between the upper and lower lamms and the third is between the lower lamms and the treadles.  These three spaces need to be approximately equal, to give each moving part space to move.

 

3. With the current tie-up the lower lamms are also at an angle
parallel to the upper lamms. Is this correct or should they be
parallel to the floor? The photos show parallel to the upper lammns.

 

On the Standard loom, you do not need to be this precise.  The lower lamms can be parallel to the floor or slant up a little.  On other countermarch looms, especially if the breast beam is lower, you would need to be more precise.  The Standard loom has a breast beam height of 36 inches, which gives you an easier tie-up than on shorter looms.

 

4. My treadles are currently too high, I can see that, so before I
re-tie, should they be parallel to the floor or at an increasing
height from 7-9 inches as in Madelyn's article?

 

On the Standard loom you do not need to be so precise.  Madelyn needed to have the left treadles a little higher as she was working with less space, since the heddles were too long.

 

In my studio I often set the treadles so that they will touch the floor when the shed is large enough.  I do that because many of the weavers who come to take a class have been weaving on jack looms.  So, they push very hard and fast on the treadles.  So, if the treadles touch the floor when the shed is big enough, it helps them to learn the new, light feel of the treadles.   If I tie the treadles up higher, they push too hard on the treadles.  This stresses the warp more than necessary and probably stresses them as well.  I don't want them to keep pushing harder than they need to.

 

The treadles do not need to all be the same height.  In fact, it is easier to find the treadle you want by feeling with your foot, if they are not all the same height.

 

In general, the Standard loom treadles should be lower than the foot rest.  That way you do not have to lift your foot onto the treadle.  You just move your foot sideways to the next treadle.

Joanne

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