Hello to forum - and how to use thrums

Hello all,

I just joined and thought I'd try out the forum function.

To get at least some on-topic discussion - when I ended up with a too short warp but too long thrums, I made a different shawl model. It can be seen on my (very new) blog - Kerstin's extras. - today's entry called Plan B

(Or maybe I'm not supposed to link "out" from Weavolution? - let's hope I learn with time...)

Kerstin in Sweden

Comments

Posted on Mon, 06/08/2009 - 18:59

 Gee I seem to have a lot of Plan Bs I have been weaving long enough now to not worry about it anymore. I have saved thrums thinking to use them chopped up into spinning fiber but that didn't work out.  I would like to learn how to make Chenille with them and do a rug that way some day. Any tips would be welcome...   Lois aka fibernut

Posted on Tue, 06/09/2009 - 18:19

Kerstin, thank you for sharing your blog url.  I've checked it out and subscribed because it's clear I'm going to like it. 

I am now trying to figure out things,here.  There is no reply under Kerstin's post but there is under the following posts.  So I simply posted a new comment. 

Also, it seems that this is a forum for those who have signed up for Efficient Weaver, but there is posting in both places. 

Soooooo.........I'm a bit confused.

Peg in South Carolina
http://talkingaboutweaving.blogspot.com/

 

Posted on Tue, 06/09/2009 - 18:23

 I made a "twice woven" mat which is basically handwoven chenille.  If your thrums are all the same length you could do that - I thought it was easy and I love, love, love the mats.

There's an article in a Handwoven - the one about pets that got many people all wound up - about making the mats.  You can have a fairly narrow warp because the "chenille" is actually make from warp lengths.  You set the warp with big spaces between a very tightly set few ends.  Then you weave with your thrums or whatever.  Then you cut it off and cut the warp into strips by cutting down the wide open spaces.  Then you use those long pieces of warp as weft. 

Not a great explanation but I'm at work - sorry!  It's well described in Handwoven, though.

Posted on Tue, 06/09/2009 - 18:29

Hi Peg,

The "posting in two places" problem should be fixed in the next two days - the posts currentlly on the Group pages are being migrated into the forums, and the same forum will appear on the Group page and the Forums page.  I've told the developers that fixing this is their top priority.

There's no "reply to" under the first post in a thread, since all comments posted are assumed to be replies to the thread starter unless they're specifically replies to comments.  I think there are technical reasons why it works that way - thread starters are treated differently from all subsequent replies/comments posted in the thread.

I'll take off my Webmistress hat and quit hijacking the thread now :-)

Tien

Posted on Wed, 06/17/2009 - 17:58

 

I do two things with thrums:  Post their availability on Freecycle.  The people who take them generally are running a school crafts program so they don't go to waste.

I also have made a quick and dirty rug on the left over warp of hawser twine from making rag rugs.  Made it like this: open   shed, cram in a wad of thrums, with shed open or not (whichever works) pull loops of the thrums up between the warp threads. Repeat at intervals across the shed (most thrums won't be long enough to extend across the width of the piece after the loops are pulled up.)  Then weave a row or two (or more) of tabby to help lock it into place.  Cut loops open and fluff out.  Caution: this makes lots of lint--best to do outside.  This was sturdy enough to survive a trip through the washer and constant use on the footstool of my favorite chair.  In fact, now that I see it has succeeded, I wish I'd spent a little more time choosing colors to make it pretty instead of just an experiment.

 

 

 

Posted on Fri, 06/19/2009 - 21:50

I was thinking of using the blue thrums I have saved separately from the others when i make a bathroom rug next month. I was going to "experiment" the same way you described but, thanks to your post, I know it works. Hooray!. I'm good to go. Thanks Alaire.

( I love this type of interchange, it has improved my weaving so much. And, I get very excited when Weavolution works as we hoped when we started designing the site.)

Claudia

Posted on Mon, 06/29/2009 - 16:25

I have a bunch of thrums that would be great for knotted pile work.  Especially the wool and silk ones.  For knotted pile the pieces can be quite small and still work.

 

Posted on Mon, 06/08/2009 - 18:59

 Gee I seem to have a lot of Plan Bs I have been weaving long enough now to not worry about it anymore. I have saved thrums thinking to use them chopped up into spinning fiber but that didn't work out.  I would like to learn how to make Chenille with them and do a rug that way some day. Any tips would be welcome...   Lois aka fibernut

Posted on Tue, 06/09/2009 - 18:19

Kerstin, thank you for sharing your blog url.  I've checked it out and subscribed because it's clear I'm going to like it. 

I am now trying to figure out things,here.  There is no reply under Kerstin's post but there is under the following posts.  So I simply posted a new comment. 

Also, it seems that this is a forum for those who have signed up for Efficient Weaver, but there is posting in both places. 

Soooooo.........I'm a bit confused.

Peg in South Carolina
http://talkingaboutweaving.blogspot.com/

 

Posted on Tue, 06/09/2009 - 18:23

 I made a "twice woven" mat which is basically handwoven chenille.  If your thrums are all the same length you could do that - I thought it was easy and I love, love, love the mats.

There's an article in a Handwoven - the one about pets that got many people all wound up - about making the mats.  You can have a fairly narrow warp because the "chenille" is actually make from warp lengths.  You set the warp with big spaces between a very tightly set few ends.  Then you weave with your thrums or whatever.  Then you cut it off and cut the warp into strips by cutting down the wide open spaces.  Then you use those long pieces of warp as weft. 

Not a great explanation but I'm at work - sorry!  It's well described in Handwoven, though.

Posted on Tue, 06/09/2009 - 18:29

Hi Peg,

The "posting in two places" problem should be fixed in the next two days - the posts currentlly on the Group pages are being migrated into the forums, and the same forum will appear on the Group page and the Forums page.  I've told the developers that fixing this is their top priority.

There's no "reply to" under the first post in a thread, since all comments posted are assumed to be replies to the thread starter unless they're specifically replies to comments.  I think there are technical reasons why it works that way - thread starters are treated differently from all subsequent replies/comments posted in the thread.

I'll take off my Webmistress hat and quit hijacking the thread now :-)

Tien

Posted on Wed, 06/17/2009 - 17:58

 

I do two things with thrums:  Post their availability on Freecycle.  The people who take them generally are running a school crafts program so they don't go to waste.

I also have made a quick and dirty rug on the left over warp of hawser twine from making rag rugs.  Made it like this: open   shed, cram in a wad of thrums, with shed open or not (whichever works) pull loops of the thrums up between the warp threads. Repeat at intervals across the shed (most thrums won't be long enough to extend across the width of the piece after the loops are pulled up.)  Then weave a row or two (or more) of tabby to help lock it into place.  Cut loops open and fluff out.  Caution: this makes lots of lint--best to do outside.  This was sturdy enough to survive a trip through the washer and constant use on the footstool of my favorite chair.  In fact, now that I see it has succeeded, I wish I'd spent a little more time choosing colors to make it pretty instead of just an experiment.

 

 

 

Posted on Fri, 06/19/2009 - 21:50

I was thinking of using the blue thrums I have saved separately from the others when i make a bathroom rug next month. I was going to "experiment" the same way you described but, thanks to your post, I know it works. Hooray!. I'm good to go. Thanks Alaire.

( I love this type of interchange, it has improved my weaving so much. And, I get very excited when Weavolution works as we hoped when we started designing the site.)

Claudia

Posted on Mon, 06/29/2009 - 16:25

I have a bunch of thrums that would be great for knotted pile work.  Especially the wool and silk ones.  For knotted pile the pieces can be quite small and still work.