The Efficient Weaver DVD

was launched today.  Currently on sale, now would be a good time to order.  :)  

http://www.interweavestore.com/the-efficient-weaver-grouped

 

cheers,

Laura

Comments

Posted on Sat, 10/18/2014 - 15:17

Hi Laura, I have been trying to buy your dvd since I heard about it yesterday.  I have tried several times to buy it on the interweave store but there seems to be a hiccup in that it won't add to my cart.  I have contacted interweave as I am so interested to get this but I thought I would let you know too because I would hate for you to miss out on sales because of a little glitch.

I would love to buy the dvd would you be interested in selling direct?

Posted on Fri, 10/24/2014 - 11:41

I was able to watch the Efficient Weaver through CraftDaily -- it was WONDERFUL. Laura, you are an excellent instructor. So wish I could spend a day in the weaving studio with you!  Thank you so much.  Nancy

Posted on Fri, 10/24/2014 - 20:08

I just sent out a request to weaving and weave tech yahoo groups but thought I'd ask here too since I know Laura is an expert and remember that Tien went to her for instruction on learning to be a more efficient weaver.  Efficiency is good but I am more interested at this time to learn how I can develop weaving rhythm so I can dance with my loom.  I spend too much time stumbling around searching for the right treadle.  Hangs me up every time.

 

Posted on Fri, 10/24/2014 - 21:23

Weaving efficiently means developing a good weaving rhytmn. Partly that will depend on your tools - some tools are just built better than others - partly it is working with them rather than against them. What kind of loom do you have? Front or back hinged treadles? I find front hinged treadles easier to treadle, for example...

Cheers
Laura

Posted on Fri, 10/24/2014 - 21:23

Weaving efficiently means developing a good weaving rhytmn. Partly that will depend on your tools - some tools are just built better than others - partly it is working with them rather than against them. What kind of loom do you have? Front or back hinged treadles? I find front hinged treadles easier to treadle, for example...

Cheers
Laura

Posted on Fri, 10/24/2014 - 21:23

Weaving efficiently means developing a good weaving rhytmn. Partly that will depend on your tools - some tools are just built better than others - partly it is working with them rather than against them. What kind of loom do you have? Front or back hinged treadles? I find front hinged treadles easier to treadle, for example...

Cheers
Laura

Posted on Fri, 10/24/2014 - 21:24

Weaving efficiently means developing a good weaving rhytmn. Partly that will depend on your tools - some tools are just built better than others - partly it is working with them rather than against them. What kind of loom do you have? Front or back hinged treadles? I find front hinged treadles easier to treadle, for example...

Cheers
Laura

Posted on Fri, 10/24/2014 - 21:25

Weaving efficiently means developing a good weaving rhytmn. Partly that will depend on your tools - some tools are just built better than others - partly it is working with them rather than against them. What kind of loom do you have? Front or back hinged treadles? I find front hinged treadles easier to treadle, for example...

Cheers
Laura

Posted on Fri, 10/24/2014 - 21:25

Weaving efficiently means developing a good weaving rhytmn. Partly that will depend on your tools - some tools are just built better than others - partly it is working with them rather than against them. What kind of loom do you have? Front or back hinged treadles? I find front hinged treadles easier to treadle, for example...

Cheers
Laura

Posted on Sat, 10/25/2014 - 17:00

I suppose if I stuck to twills and plain weave, I'd be doing better.  Shuttle throwing with my two current projects a mohair wide blanket and my first rug slowing me down.  

I have two looms I love which are Glimakra standards but they have back hinged treadles. One suggestion was to pay more attention to the layout of the treadles so that I have more space inbetween or a setup that was a more natural step/treadle action that suited me.  Another suggestion was line dancing classes.  I think that if I thought of the treadling in terms of music beat or dance steps to a beat, it would help me find a rhythm.  Any other suggestions gratefully received!  I have lots of videos but they usually focus on the beginnings and how to fix errors or how to hold and throw the shuttle.  So far, I have not heard or read any discussion about how they developed that weaving rhythm I am so in awe of when I see experienced weavers weave!

Posted on Sat, 10/25/2014 - 17:26

I do find back hinged treadles a little more difficult.  Does your loom have a treadle 'gate'?  This can help keep the treadles from wobbling around so much.  I think Su Butler might have photos on her website but a 'gate' is essentially a piece of wood with dowels inserted and then laid on the floor so that the dowels prevent the side to side wobble of the treadles.  If you then have a foot rest and can tie the treadles up so that you can rest yone heel on the foot rest while the other treadles it can be a bit easier to move your feet from treadle to treadle.  Some sort of tactile marker on the foot rest can help you find where you want your foot to be.

Changing the tie up to better flow might also help.  Tie ups are not written in stone - as long as you use the correct combination in the correct sequence, you can tie the treadles up any way you like.  :)

cheers,

Laura

who apologizes for the multiple posts...if I knew how to remove them, I would!

Posted on Tue, 04/26/2016 - 22:48

I am a brand new weaver and recently purchased a much loved floor loom from the daughter of the woman who previously owned it and has since passed. I just recently began weaving on a rigid heddle loom and have been devouring every video and book I can find. I have as of yet used the floor loom as I have been replacing rusted parts and doing general clean up. It is a Leclerc 36" Artisat and the tie-on rods are pretty rusted. Is it important to use steel rods or can I replace those with 3/4" hardwood dowels?

I purchased your Efficient Weaver DVD and loved it. I have watched it several times since I received it last Friday. I want to begin with good habits to the best of my ability.

I love your warping valet/trapeze and was wondering if there is a template available so that I can build one of my own? I thought I understood that you did not purchase it elsewhere. While I may not need one for a while it is a great tool to have. What kind of wood is yours made from to prevent snagging threads?

Any information you can provide would be greatly appreciated!

Kind regards,

Diana

Posted on Tue, 04/26/2016 - 22:59

I use a big (about 4" thick) round wooden roller about 3' long with lag bolts screwed into the ends as a valet.  I hang it above whatever loom I am working on (I have exposed rafters in my studio).  I also use the top beam of a Scandinavian-style loom as a valet.

Interestingly, I have tried to get some sort of mobile music in my studio, but didn't want to spend a lot of money.  I got two JBL flip bluetooth speakers that stream music from a phone.  These sound great, go where ever I do, and last about 6 hours.  I find I have a better rhythm and fewer stops if I work to music.

Posted on Tue, 04/26/2016 - 23:17

Katy Meek has written a book on how to make a warping trapeze - essentially the same thing but mounted in the loom.  It's called Dance with your loom and she still has copies to sell.  Otherwise, all I use is a rod mounted to the ceiling partly because my loom never gets moved, partly because my ceiling isn't very high and I'm tall enough to reach it.  :)

Posted on Tue, 04/26/2016 - 23:23

I will check out the book.

I also was inquiring about the tie-on rods. Do they have to be steel rods? Can they be replaced with 3/4" hardwood dowel sticks?