Ikat and shifting devices

I don't know how many here weave using ikat technique. Ikat being defined as a resist dyeing technique using tight bindings instead of a coating as the resist.  The word ikat is of Iindonesian origin but the technique is known in other areas of the world and is also knwon by other names such as "matmi" in Thailand.  Ikat has pre-Columbian roots in South and Central America and Mexico. Ikat can be used in the warp or the weft or both and there are many beauriful examples of weaving using ikat technque. One of the ways to create patterns is to shift the pattern in the warp.  Here is are some examples from a recent class:

 

These were all shifted by hand. There are, however,  shifting devices and I recently did a search on the subject and found some very interesting informatin on both the making and use of shifting boxes at this site :http://www.medievaltextiles.org/news26.pdf  

Comments

Posted on Sun, 01/08/2012 - 00:16

Thank you! I have a box for shifted warp ikat which I have never used, I will now print out this article. Ikat is not my working focus this year but will be at some time because I find ikat design rich with possibilities. I thank you for posting the photos from the class very interesting and beautiful.

Posted on Sun, 01/08/2012 - 17:47

You're welcome, my intent for this group was as a forum for exchanging information on techniques and I agree that ikat has a lot of possibilities. Do you have a commercially made shifting box or one that was home made? Can you post a photograph?

Regards, Charles

Posted on Sun, 01/08/2012 - 13:07

Charles
I'm out of town, but i am happy to get a photo up when I'm back early next week. It's home made with instructions that I bought from an instructor some time ago, maybe 15 years ?, at convergence. I should be able to find her name as well.

Posted on Sun, 01/08/2012 - 15:14

I guess once you have the warp in through the device, you can't change the pattern.  That would be almost impossible without retying and retensioning the whole warp.  But what it does is pretty amazing.  Thanks for posting this.

Posted on Sun, 01/08/2012 - 17:36

You might like to take a look at the weft-faced work of Mary Zicafoose in ikat. Amazing images.
Tommye

Posted on Sun, 01/08/2012 - 18:13

Yes Tommye , Mary's work is outstanding! It is totally beyond me how one does ikat and tapestry together. Unles it's like other weft ikat where you weave it in and mark the design, take it out, tie it, dye it, then reweave it. I suppose that's how it's done. Thanks for sharing that site, makes me want to pull out the ikat tape!

Posted on Sun, 01/08/2012 - 23:50

I saw an ikat shifting box in use in Kyoto, Japan in 2003 at the Nishijin. They are used to make wonderful patterns for yardage from relatively simple bindings. Complicated binding patterns are also used in Japan for warp and weft ikat (in Japanese it is kasuri) but shifting is more practical for long warps. You might find diagrams of the boxes by searching for kasuri or looking for books on Japanese woven textiles.

The Japanese box did not look difficult to make. You could adjust the placement of the bars to create different designs for the next warp. There is some wasted warp.

Bonnie Inouye

Posted on Mon, 01/09/2012 - 03:17

Janice is a well known textile artist in Northern Ca.  Janice's webpage is www.janicesullivantextiles.com and she teaches at City College of San Francisco and taught weaving at College of the Redwoods until her class was cut along with a number of other art classes.  Janice has a great repertoire of techniques which she teaches including weaving, tapestry, and dyeing. Among the weaving topics Janice teaches ikat, Theo Moorman technique, shibori and others. Janice's work includes mixed media utilizing textile techniques with hand made paper and incorporating different materials in her textile work such as wire, bamboo, reed, and various natural animal fibers. I was not a student at this ikat course, I am fortunate to be able to count Janice as a friend.

Best regards, Charles

Posted on Mon, 01/09/2012 - 11:39

Another incredible artist! BTW, I did see at the Mary Zicafoose site ,which Charles posted, Mary is teaching a 5 day ikat workshop early August at the Mendocino Arts Center, I think it's called that. I can't go but maybe some one else can:)

Posted on Mon, 01/09/2012 - 16:44

a typically Japanese technique. A box  to support rods at different heights is attached to the back beam of a loom and parts of the warp go over these rods, making their path longer. For one time try you can just clamp blocks to the back beam. The book,
Japanese Ikat Weaving: The Techniques of Kasuri
by Jun Tomita and Noriko Tomita has clear diagrams of the box-- very simple ; two sides with matching holes and some rods.  There is some waste when you tie on because of the different lengths.  The benefit is the simpler bindings you can do. 

Easy for a beginer is shifted weft ikat.  Make a simple band for your resist then move it over just a smidge each pick and made a diagonal, then reverse and make a chevron then on to curves.  This technique is well described in Lydia Van Gelder's book, Ikat.

I posted a project here, One Pot Ikat,


that uses a dovetailed warp with a cord at the dovetail.  The cord allows you to shift the warp then tie simple bindings for dyeing then shift back before warping the loom.  No waste.  I learned this technique from weavings from Highland Equador.  In addition, the starting yarns are multicolored and are overdyed.  Little effort, big impact.

The home decor ikats that Weaverdave posted look to be from Central Asia.  There was a recent show at the Textile Museum in DC on these and has generated a lot of interest.  These are not shifted ikats but each part is individually tied and they are usually dyed in yellow , red and blue requiring new ties for each color. 

There is a current resurrgence in Central Asian ikats as Kyrgyzstan tries to reclaim its cultural heritage.

You can see more in Colors of the Oasis: Central Asian Ikats,Sumru Belger Krody

This ikat is visually stuning was part of an exhibit documented in Ikat: splendid silks of central asia, Gibbon & Hale. My favorites were the velvet ikats!

Don't forget the ikat rebozos of Mexico

and the jaspe cloth of Central America.


Posted on Mon, 01/09/2012 - 17:58

Thank you Karren for sharing those. I love your "one pot ikat!" is that a scarf or shawl? Great info.  I've seen some of the ikat rebozos, I'm quite taken up with them.  Thaks again, you rphotos are an inspiration.

Best regards, Charles

Posted on Mon, 01/09/2012 - 18:17

but I didn't have enough yarn dyed for all the workshop participants and the second panel.  So everyone else got a two panel poncho and I got a shawl.  I dyed black, others did chocolate or deep dark blue.  When I plan workshop I must remember that it takes the participants three times as long as I think it should and they always use more materials than I think.  Eventually I will learn.

Posted on Tue, 01/10/2012 - 21:20

I have a shifting box that I have used off and on for about 20 years.  I got it from Pauline Sergeant at Penland in about 1993?  There are instructions for making and using one in a book I have at home in my studio.  If you are interesting contact me and I'll look up the name of it.  I am at work now and unable to remember the name of the book, something about Japanese ikat.

I love using the box.  I have been able to create some really beautiful things with it.  The are usually weft faced.

Ann

Ann

Posted on Tue, 01/10/2012 - 21:21

I have a shifting box that I have used off and on for about 20 years.  I got it from Pauline Sergeant at Penland in about 1993?  There are instructions for making and using one in a book I have at home in my studio.  If you are interesting contact me and I'll look up the name of it.  I am at work now and unable to remember the name of the book, something about Japanese ikat.

I love using the box.  I have been able to create some really beautiful things with it.  The are usually weft faced.

Ann

Ann

Posted on Wed, 01/11/2012 - 14:51

shifting box

this is one panel of the shifting box i have. there are three panels drilled exactly the same. they are held equadistance from each other by rods which protrude through the holes. Size: length 20inx height14inxdepth3/4in plywood,except, one of the three pieces is 1/8in plexiglass. not all the holes are used. it depends on the design. the rods are covered by plexiglass on the inside to keep the warp away from the threading or whatever on the metal rods. These plans, like Ann, are from Pauline Sargeant back in the 90"s but from a seminar at Convergence so I don"t know much about the process. Hoever I do have the the book that Karren recommends Japenese Ikat Weaving by Jun and Noriko Tomita(i used it for weft ikat)and it has very good photos of the boxes with instructions. plus how to tie the tape for weft ikat. It's a little book, I got mine for $20.00, i think it"s well worth the price.

Posted on Wed, 01/11/2012 - 22:07

Ann, that is simply gorgeous!!

Posted on Thu, 01/12/2012 - 23:07

Thanks, I have a new space to work in and am looking forward to doing more of it.  The book previously mentioned, Japanese Ikat is the one that I referred to. 

Ann

Posted on Tue, 01/17/2012 - 19:02

Thanks, I was gone for a week with no electronic media and I come back to thses gorgeous weavings.  Thanks.  The shifting box panel is intresting Cathie, I like the way it is laid out with the ability to shift as much as one owuld like or as little. 

Regards, Charles