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Sally Orgren's picture

CCW 2014 — Klee "Young Moe"

Project
Project Status: 
Finished
Project Date: 
Mon, 11/11/2013 - Thu, 03/27/2014
Yarn
Yarn: 10/2 cotton
Color: black & white
Type: warp
Loom
Loom Used: 
Tools of the Trade
Number of Shafts: 
8
Number of Treadles: 
8
Sett: 
30.00 EPI
Length on Loom: 
6.30 yd
Width on Loom: 
25.62 in
Finished Length: 
5.27 yd
Finished Width: 
22.25 in
Notes: 

11/11/13

I have posted projects in the past about this year-long color challenge to weave a fabric based on a painting or painter. The deadline for samples is March, so I am hot in pursuit of an idea that will excite me on a color and structure level to weave off a bunch of yardage.

I have been playing with my Klee never-ending book while traveling and away from the looms in November & December. An unlikely source of inspiration was found at Home Depot in early November. They had some mats that caught my eye. I took a cell phone photo, completed fabric analysis at home to determine the structure, then dropped "Young Moe" colors into the draft (photo posted at top of page). I liked it well enough compared to the painting, but what could I DO with the resulting fabric? It still looked like upholstery fabric to me. So I didn't waste any more time refining the placement of the stripes, etc. and left off working on this draft.

12/6/14

While working on warp plans for Echo Weave and Crimp Cloth, I ended up doing a bit of clean up in the studio. I ran across some sample books from a guild exchange(JHW) completed a few years ago on Huck Lace. In the sample collection was an intriguing pattern of polychrome Huck woven by Sherrie Miller. That became the new source for my current draft. After plugging in general colors and playing with placement, I added those random pinstripes of black. I like it!

But I still don't feel like I have the colors where I want them. I also need to check sources to see what color options there are available.So I will continue to tinker on this draft for awhile longer.

12/8/14

Refined the draft by eliminating the darker blue and some of the other colors, tweaking, and adding ivory. White was too white, natural was too white, too. (Of course, I don't have ivory in my stash, and don't think I can get it domestically. Sigh.) I felt the previous color combination was too greyed, it deadened the piece from the original cheery artwork. I also changed the ratio of neutrals to colors. I realized in the painting there is a lot more allocation of space to the neutrals.

And, upon inspection, there was a glaring error in my treadling, so I corrected THAT, too!

I printed out a simulation without the black lines, and plan to go in with a Sharpie to determine where and how I would like to place those.

Then obtain the needed materials, and I can begin warping...

The other big decision is how wide and how long of a warp. I can set this up for a garment or dishtowels...I am looking at using 16/2 so it would be a nice garment weight, but not sure about jacket weight. For dishtowels, the black can be somewhat random, buf for a garment, I might want to think more carefully about placement, as Sally E pointed out. Scale = each stripe is about 1/2 of an inch, so this is small.

2/7/14

The yarns from Camilla Valley arrived, so I am starting with the "Home Depot" draft/sample first. For the weft, I am going to use the ivory and the medium blue, and then switch to then light blue and natural. The ivory seems more true to the colors in the painting, but the natural may make the overall piece feel "brighter". I won't know until I take this off the loom and wash the fabric. This would be MUCH easier to treadle on a floor loom.

I am still working on where to place the blue weft stripes. In my initial sample I felt they were too frequent, i.e. too much blue. Achieving the correct color balance and getting the blue to fall on opposite blocks is what I am striving for.

2/9/14

I put the second sampler warp on the loom (8 shaft Huck). Just over a yard. Not so sure about this one as I was originally. I'll await the finishing to see how the yarn truly deflects.

I want to try making the black lines a bit stronger, perhaps doubling or using a larger grist yarn. I wanted them a bit randomized. Also, on the left half I used natural, on the right half, ivory. I think on the first sample, I preferred the natural, although the ivory was truer to the painting. (This warp was certainly easier to wind the warp and weave!)

2/20/14

Here's the side by side comparison. What do you think?

Please note both samples have subtle color shifts and treadling variations as part of the sampling process.

3/27/14

Wove the fabric in an intensive weeklong event, to make the March 31 mailing date. 

Take up and shrinkage in both directions was 15-16%. I got 32 samples + 4 towels from the yardage, plus one 4" band with a treadling error so bad, I could not correct. I spent two whole days making corrections in the fabric so it would be nearly perfect throughout. I treadled the black line incorrectly a few times, so that was the worst error to correct, needle-threading the correct path at 30 epi across 23" of fabric!

It took 120 picks to = 1 repeat, 6 shuttles/colors, resulting in about 4.125" of fabric. Washed with tide, dried in the dryer on cotton setting, pressed on the cotton setting. 

I may consider redrafting so the edges do not have the lace pattern for better selvedges. However, on the towels, someone commented they liked the scalloped edge effect of the draw-in from the lace.

Sally Orgren's picture

Separating a Warp, Transferring the cross

Project
Project Status: 
Warping
Project Date: 
Fri, 02/01/2013
Yarn
Yarn: unmercerized cotton
Color: natural
Type: warp
Loom
Number of Shafts: 
12
Number of Treadles: 
12
Notes: 

For more ideas on this process, please cross reference the thread, "Transfer the cross (to anyplace!) http://weavolution.com/forum/weaving/tra...

The situation — I wound too much warp for 1/2 of the project width, so some of the warp has to be removed before threading. It has to be a "surgical" removal to conserve the intended pattern repeat, so I can't just take off one side. And the pattern I am threading does not produce tabby, so threading the loom and then creating a shed to insert the second set of lease sticks won't work either. 

I have lease sticks in behind the castle. The loom is beamed, but not threaded yet. I have the warp under tension via water weights in front. 

I would like to remove select areas of the warp in the back, reducing the overall width of the warp. My thought was to pull out those sections, insert the cross into them, and then let them hang off the back of the loom while I weave off the desired warp that remains. This way, I have a second set of warps with their own lease sticks that I can reintroduce for sampling when I finish this short warp. I posted this query on the thread referenced above. Thanks to several Weavo member postings, I pursued their ideas as follows:

The solution — I used the white, flexible plastic strapping tape that comes wrapped about TV, computer, and office paper boxes. Following one of the original lease stick paths, I used this flexible tool to segment out the warp I wanted to keep. (* I should have selected the warp I wanted to remove!) I slid a rigid metal lease stick along the same path & called that A. I went to the other "original" lease stick and only focused on the selected groups from A, picking up their counterparts with the plastic strapping tape. Once completed, I slid in a metal lease stick to replace the plastic, and called that A also. I did not join the two sticks, but slid them out to the perimeter of my working area, which was very small on the back of a Voyager. The original lease sticks stayed in place. I have 4 lease sticks in the warp at this point.

Now that the cross is transferred to my desired warp A, I still had to disentangle the original lease sticks. They cannot just be pulled out, because I need the cross in place on the warp (B) I will be removing. So I had to repeat the process with the warps I wanted to remove, segmenting them out with the strapping tape, inserting a metal lease stick and labeling them. I kept checking to make sure I wasn't snagging an incorrect warp. Having the warp under good tension helped, but was not a perfect solution. You need a balance of tension, but being able to flip the lease sticks on edge to make a mini-shed and manipulte the warps up or down as needed.

With 6 lease sticks in the warp, (defining Warp A, Warp B, and the original lease sticks), I did a final check to make sure the layers were separate before sliding out the original sticks. There were a few errant warps, but I can recapture those to their appropriate layer.

Next time — I should have pulled the warp I wanted to eliminate to the TOP, not left it on the bottom.

Follow up — It was a pain to lift Warp B to the top, and when I did, I should have put it at the very back of the loom, not by the castle. 

I used an ironing board as a staging area for this process with the table loom, so I could adjust the height as needed. High for beaming with the water weights, lower down for this tedious process.

I sincerely hope that by posting, no one (myself included!) will have to go through these kind of gymnastics if you make the same kind of mistake warping!

weaversouth's picture

Bookmark for St. Paul's Selma, AL

Project
Project Status: 
Finished
Project Date: 
Wed, 04/01/2009 - Sun, 04/12/2009
Yarn
Yarn:
Color:
Type:
Loom
Number of Shafts: 
8
Number of Treadles: 
1
Sett: 
36.00 Ends/cm
Length on Loom: 
9.00 ft
Width on Loom: 
3.00 in
Finished Length: 
7.00 ft
Finished Width: 
2.25 in
Notes: 

also wove this as a dukagang for a few of the bookmarks

 

this keeps showing in preview as 2.25 feet.  NOT!

weaversouth's picture

St. Paul's bookmark, dukagang

Number of Shafts: 
8
Number of Treadles: 
12
Source
This Draft is from: 
My own design
Uploads
Draft Image: 

If you are using a table loom, it is easier to follow if you convert it to "peg' or "lift"  Also, you can open this in "Word" and the lifts will be "spelled out" which I find easier to follow on the table loom, or if using the treadling draft.

I sampled these on the "Frieda" loom (like the taqueté versions) and wove them on the AVL WDL.  The taqueté and dukagang are woven on the same warp/threading.

Times Used: 
0