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summer and winter

ReedGuy's picture

Six Point Star in Summer and Winter - Dukagång

Number of Shafts: 
8
Number of Treadles: 
10
Source
This Draft is from: 
My own design
Additional Source Info: 

Treadle 4 is not treadled. I never took it out because Fiberworks doesn't allow removing a tie-up column from the draft like it does a treadling row.

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smedway's picture

No. 11

Number of Shafts: 
6
Number of Treadles: 
10
Source
This Draft is from: 
Book
Source Title: 
A Book of Patterns for Handweaving
Author(s): 
John Landes, Mary Megs Atwater
Publication Date: 
1977
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rstovin's picture

Steph and Oli towels

Project
Project Status: 
Finished
Project Date: 
Thu, 05/01/2014 - Thu, 06/05/2014
Yarn
Yarn: 10/2 Mercerized Cotton
Color: natural
Type: warp
Yarn: 5/2 Perle Cotton
Color: Loden and Avocado
Type: weft
Loom
Loom Used: 
Jane (aka Miss Bennet)
Number of Shafts: 
4
Sett: 
24.00 EPI
Notes: 

Made up a name draft for the giftees (based on an aesthetic variation on "Steph loves Oli" and reversing, ostensibly to "Oli loves Steph") and used it to create a profile draft.  I am weaving it in Summer & Winter - my first foray into this weave structure - using two colours of 5/2 mercerized cotton for the pattern weft, Loden and Avocado.  The warp and tabby weft are in Natural, 10/2 mercerized cotton.

Camilla Valley offers mini-cones (about 790 yards each) for the 5/2, so I didn't have to spend a ton or expand my weaving stash by too too much.  I got a full pound cone of the 10/2, so will have enough left to do another project this size.

07 May - Done a couple of repeats in an X-treadling, and while I like it, I think I'll do each of the 4 towels in something different.  I might do an O-treadling, an alternating treadling, and...  Dukagang?  Or something else?

For the first repeat, I was beating too softly, so I've tightened it up for the second.  I'm excited to see how they will look after they are washed; I'm hoping it will spread the pattern weft threads a bit more evenly.  I'm really enjoying weaving in summer & winter, and by the second repeat, I had pretty much figured out the treadling for each block, so it's just a matter of following the profile draft to figure out which block is next.

10 May - Started the second towel in a different treadling than the first - I like it a lot!  I like that the towels will clearly be a set but will all be different.

15 May - Started the third towel, this time in an alternating treadling for the tie-downs.  It makes the edges of the blocks look a bit blurry, but I really like the contrast between the two blocks.  Plus it's an easy treadling to remember.

21 May - Started the fourth towel, today, this time with the dukagang treadling.  I really really like it.  It has a really strong vertical element to the design, and that takes away from the symmetry, somewhat, but I still like it.

5 June - Finished the weaving about a week ago - I ran out of warp before finishing the last repeat on the dukagang, and had a couple of loomy disasters at the end of it, but it all finished up fine.

I elected to hand stitch between the towels before cutting (a blanket stitch, rather than machine zig-zag) and then hand stitched the hems down.

After washing, they clearly tightened up a lot, and the designs are all clearer.  I love how they look, individually and as a set.

VladkaCe's picture

Christmas table runners

Project
Project Status: 
Finished
Project Date: 
Tue, 02/17/2015
Yarn
Yarn: Cotton
Color: white
Type: warp
Yarn: Cotton
Color: white, yellow, green, red
Type: warp
Loom
Number of Shafts: 
6
VladkaCe's picture

Summer and Winter table runners

Project
Project Status: 
Finished
Project Date: 
Tue, 02/17/2015
Yarn
Yarn: Cotton
Color: white
Type: warp
Yarn: Cotton
Color: white, pink, blue
Type: warp
Loom
Number of Shafts: 
6
VladkaCe's picture

Summer and winter placemates

Project
Project Status: 
Finished
Project Date: 
Mon, 02/16/2015
Yarn
Yarn: Cotton
Color: beige
Type: warp
Yarn: Cotton
Color: beige and brown
Type: warp
Loom
Number of Shafts: 
5
Number of Treadles: 
18
Sett: 
16.00 EPI
Missouri weaver's picture

Great blue heron tote bag

Project
Project Status: 
Finished
Project Date: 
Sat, 07/05/2014 - Sat, 10/18/2014
Yarn
Yarn: 10/2 mercerized cotton
Color: 3 shades of green
Type: warp
Yarn: 10/2 mercerized cotton
Color: medium blue
Type: weft
Loom
Loom Used: 
AVL dobby loom
Number of Shafts: 
24
Number of Treadles: 
2
Sett: 
24.00 EPI
Length on Loom: 
12.00 yd
Width on Loom: 
24.00 in
Finished Length: 
36.00 in
Finished Width: 
22.00 in
Notes: 

This design was inspired by a friend who loves great blue herons.  Out of my 12 yard warp I wove 3 table mats, 2 placemats, fabric for 2 totebags, and three towels.  I will tie on to part of this warp for table runners in natural and half-bleached linen.

Sally Orgren's picture

Art Deco Dishtowels

Project
Project Status: 
Warping
Project Date: 
Fri, 05/23/2014 - Sat, 05/24/2014
Yarn
Yarn:
Color:
Type:
Loom
Loom Used: 
Tools of the Trade
Number of Shafts: 
8
Number of Treadles: 
9
Sett: 
36.00 EPI
Length on Loom: 
8.00 yd
Width on Loom: 
21.60 in
Notes: 

This project is for my guild's tied weave challenge, due in June. After the samples are woven to exchange, I plan to make dish towels for the fall sale. As tied weaves tend to be thicker than regular weaves, I went to a finer thread for the warp/background in the hopes I will get the designs I want, at the size I want, AND a decent towel weight — not too thick.

I spent considerable time planning this warp. The original motif was 72 threads. Using 10/2 warp at 24 epi, the box would be nearly 3" wide. Too big for a 21" wide towel. I decided to reduce some of the blocks down and use 16/2 for the warp, leading me to a pattern of 60 threads at 30 epi, with a motif a 2". That was still too big for my taste, until a guild mate recommended using "half blocks". So instead of 1(tie down), P(pattern shaft), 2, P, I just used "Tiedown", P, "Tiedown", meaning I used an odd number of pattern warps in each block, and then just re-ran the tie downs on shafts 1 & 2 to alternate. This gives me a motif of 1.3" wide using 20/2 cotton at 36 epi, which is just right.

You'll notice my treadling is illustrated a bit oddly. This is how I would illustrate it if I were weaving on a table loom and lifting levers across each row.

The basic idea is tie down 1 + pattern, tabby a (1+2), tie down 2 + pattern, tabby b (everything else). The "trick" for me is that I am using half blocks, so we'll have to see how these motifs come out (balanced or what) when I treadle. Software makes it look nice and square, but when weaving, maybe not so much because you have a tabby between these pattern picks. 

Next, I spent another bit of time figuring out my actual treadling on the floor loom so this wasn't too complicated for the "muscle memory" between my feet and head. I will take a scan and post that photo. I sat at the dining room table and sketched it out (feet dancing under the table) until I felt I could follow the pattern steps with the fewest errors.

I decided to time my warping:

30 minutes to wind 200 ends at 8 yards, so 2 hours winding 768 warps.

An hour to beam (with the help of water weights.)

About 10 minutes to thread 1 repeat (48 threads) @ 16 repeats across the warp = 3 hours  

Checking my threading ??

Threading the reed 1 hour

Fiddling with everything, the tie up, tie-on and tensioning...??? Maybe an hour or two?

5/26/14

This project is moving along rapidly! I took Bonnie's suggestion and tried the Dukagang treadling with tie down 1 (in blue). I also changed the number of repeats, which elonagated the box a bit. I'll make a final judgement after washing. I plan to set aside 1/2 of the sample to leave unwashed, and wash the other half for comparison. (And yes, I changed the tie up so the motif was on top, and delightfully, it is less weight to lift.)

In terms of project timeline, this is the part that I should measure! The previous stuff was mostly "mechanics". This part is the critical step — maximizing what is on the loom for the best design and color potential. I like to build in a day or two to process what I am seeing on the loom and think about how I want to proceed.

This draft is from The Carol Strickler book of 8 shaft weaves, but it has been modified from the original source.

Here is the somewat "cleaned up" draft of both treadlings, Bricks (green) and Dukagang (blue) treadlings. Since I left the tie down treadles independent of each other, I step on both 1+2 when I need to weave one half of the background (plain weave or tabby). 1+2 (tie downs) alternate with "all the rest" of the shafts.

5/27/14

First sample washed, and I lost 8% in width, 10-12% length. (Take up was 4%, shrinkage 4% in width)

I'll get a better read on this information when I wet finish a larger sample at complete width. For my guild, I wanted to keep part of the first sample unwashed, so they can see what a difference wet finishing makes. (As in toss in the washing machine, dryer, and steam press, not just hand swishing in warm water with an air dry.) It's gonna be a dishtowel, so it better be able to stand up to some true wet finishing! ;-)

5/28/14

After taking a few samples off the loom, I wanted to explore more color options, so I dug out the cones of yarn that were contenders for pattern wefts (10/2) and background wefts (20/2). Then it was fastest to just use colored pencils to sketch up some possible combinations.

6/1/14

I have woven all my samples for the guild exchange, and completed the first towel in Southwest colors. I'll do three sets of matching towels, each is a different colorway and possibly different treadling. I decided after sampling that I prefer the bricks treadling, even though the Dukagang treadling might be simpler. I am about equally fast at treadling either of them at this point.

Here is the technique of cutting off samples while maintaining warp tension and incurring very little loom waste. I paint a mixture of glue and water on the cutting line after weaving a rod or dowel into the web. It is important to weave at least an inch of material before the dowel. After the glue has dried, I cut the fabric off, relash the apron to the dowel, and keep weaving with only about 1.25" of loom waste.

I was also thinking about something someone told me a few weeks ago —about how she spent a whole day at a workshop learning how to weave plain weave. When I was doing the middle part of the towel, I was reminded about that comment and paid special attention to my weaving so I could get good selveges and balanced fabric. At 36 epi, inconsistencies have a way of showing up! Also, typically I like to use a temple, but it wasn't needed on this project. 

6/5/14

Only 2 yards left to weave. I am going to try something different for the last two towels (I think.)

Maybe something like this...it's a variation in the Stickler book, but it may not look the same when woven because I switched to half blocks on this pattern. Only sampling will tell!

 

Queezle's picture

Summer & Winter Dishtowels

Project
Project Status: 
Weaving
Project Date: 
Sat, 03/01/2014 - Fri, 03/21/2014
Yarn
Yarn:
Color:
Type:
Loom
Number of Shafts: 
7
Number of Treadles: 
9
Sett: 
30.00 EPI
Length on Loom: 
9.00 yd
Notes: 

This project is a set of dish towels in summer and winter.  I played around with S&W on two samples, and for both, the selvedges were a nightmare.  Why I decided to proceed with a long warp of dish towels, I may never know.  But I think I licked my selvedge problems.  First, I threaded more warp ends on the two edges, something I had seen discussed at ravelry.  Second, I used the make-shift temple idea that has been linked on this site many times. 

My final break-through was realizing that fewer weft colors was better, and I am quite happy with the result (so far).  Now, if I could only make fewer treadling errors.

smedway's picture

#157, Shuttle-Craft Book of American Handweaving

Number of Shafts: 
4
Number of Treadles: 
6
Source
This Draft is from: 
Book
Source Title: 
Shuttle-Craft Book of American Handweaving
Author(s): 
Atwater, Mary Meigs
Publication Date: 
1931
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