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Double Weave Silk Scarf

tisserande's picture
Doubleweave Silk Scarf
Project
Draft: 
Doubleweave
Project Status: 
Finished
Project Date: 
Sun, 03/25/2012 - Tue, 03/27/2012
Yarn
Yarn: 20/2 silk
Color: pink, purple
Type: warp
Loom
Loom Used: 
Leclerc
Number of Shafts: 
8
Number of Treadles: 
8
Sett: 
24.00 EPI
Length on Loom: 
2.70 m
Width on Loom: 
8.60 in
Finished Length: 
175.00 cm
Finished Width: 
7.50 in
Notes: 

The scarf is finished.  Not much change when removed from the loom as the warp and weft were both silk, so no differential shrinkage.

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tisserande's picture
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Joined: 06/09/2009
I am also using a Japanese

I am also using a Japanese flame 8/1 silk yarn - sorry was unable to add this info to the above.

Bonnie Inouye's picture
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Joined: 06/15/2009
deflected double weave

We call this "deflected double weave" now, but drafts for this structure have appeared with other names in the past. It is like Finn Weave but usually that is used for pick-up instead of loom control.

Your colors are very pretty. Please post a photo of the finished piece after washing because it will look quite different.

Bonnie

tisserande's picture
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Joined: 06/09/2009
Hi Bonnie, I have done

Hi Bonnie, I have done deflected doubleweave before but am not sure what is the difference between ordinary doubleweave and deflected doubleweave.  This was actually called "brocade weave" in the book, and was from a workshop by Virginia West.

Ellen's picture
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Joined: 08/12/2009
It also looks a lot like a

It also looks a lot like a scarf I did in a draft that was called "integrated cell weave". I agree with Bonnie, it is in very lovely colours and the choices of yarns make me ceratin it will feel wonderful.

tisserande's picture
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Joined: 06/09/2009
Hi Ellen, seems to have lots

Hi Ellen, seems to have lots of different names this particular weave.  It is an interesting effect, especially when several colours are used.  Thanks for your comment :)

Bonnie Inouye's picture
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Joined: 06/15/2009
deflected double weave

The name "deflected double weave" was promoted by Madelyn van der Hoogt while she was editor of Weaver's magazine. The integrated cell pattern is a variation that was included in Weaver's. I miss Weaver's. 

Regular double weave alternates a dark thread and a light thread except for special cases. The structure of double weave looks like stair-steps if you view it with black warp and white weft. Shapes with diagonals or curves which have a smooth edge on the right will have a slightly jagged edge on the left, on both faces of the cloth.

Deflected double weave uses groups of 2, 4, 6 or another even number. You thread a group of light warps and then a group of dark warps and the wefts also come in groups of 2 or more. Shapes have smooth edges on right and left of the top face and jagged edges on right and left of the reverse face of the cloth. Squares tend to look rounded after washing.

Your scarf is beautiful!

Bonnie

Joined: 06/08/2009
Bonnie,

now I am thoroughly confused (it might be a language "thing", though).

Above you write "It is like Finn Weave but usually that is used for pick-up instead of loom control." I have never seen a Finn weave with floats? I my books (Swedish, mostly) Finn weave consists of two (independent) layers of plain weave, where patterning is obtained by pick-up (and pick-down). The examples I have seen (and woven) show no "deflection" at all - partly because there is no room for deflection (as the ends/picks of both layers essentially weave in plain weave).

"Cell weave" (cellväv) is the only term I have seen, applied to deflected dw, in Swedis (fwiw:-).

I also get confused by this: "Regular double weave alternates a dark thread and a light thread except for special cases." I thought double weave consisted of two layers, regardless of colour? (I do agree that, usually, it alternates one end from each layer, except for special cases)

Pardon my confused English, sometimes it is difficult when special terms can't be found in dictionaries - but I try to learn!

tisserande's picture
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Joined: 06/09/2009
Bonnie

Bonnie, thanks for your comments and for taking the time to explain the differences, which I have to confess will take me a while to get my head around!