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Reading & Writing Drafts

wilowind's picture

 

How do you read/ write drafts? I've always done plain weave & am ready to try something new. I'd also like to design some.
 
Cathy S/Willowwind
TNWEAVE's picture
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Joined: 08/11/2009
One set of numbers represents

One set of numbers represents the number of shafts on the draft and the other set of numbers represents the tie up sequence.

wilowind's picture
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Joined: 04/18/2010
  <!--Session data-->   Is

 

 

Is that something I could use with a rigid heddle loom? That's what i have at this point.

Cathy

 

TNWEAVE's picture
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Not fimilar with rigid heddle

Not fimilar with rigid heddle looms, never use one. Sorry

lkautio's picture
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Joined: 06/11/2009
Drafting is definitely worth

Drafting is definitely worth learning and has applications to designing for rigid heddle looms.

The numbers or dots in horizontal line at top or bottom refer to the sequence of shafts in the threading (or in a profile drafts groups of threads in a threading).  The numbers going down or up the side refer to the treadling.  In the corner is sometimes a small box which shows which shafts are lifted together - called the tie up.  The large patterned area is the drawdown, which is a graphic representation of the surface of the cloth.  Usually in a threading draft (one showing what each individual thread is doing)  a black square represents a warp thread at the surface and a white square represents a weft thread on the surface of the cloth. In a profile draft a black square usually represents a group of threads weaving pattern and a white square represents a group of threads weaving background.  There are many good books which will guide you through construction of a weaving draft, including most beginning books meant for 4 shafts or more.

With a rigid heddle you can use any draft you like, for any number of shafts, but the pattern will be manually controlled (picked up) rather than controlled by the threading, tie up, and treadling.  To design for rigid heddle, graph out your pattern and then use a combination of the two sheds plus pickup to make the pattern sheds (lift a set of threads and then add or subtract from it to make the pattern).  Any weave structure based on plain weave (such as laces) will be particularly easy to graph and weave on a rigid heddle.  However, you can do any structure on the rigid heddle with perseverance and a good understanding of how the structure works.

Have fun - drafting is the way to open the door to understanding :-)

Laurie Autio

Caroline's picture
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Joined: 06/09/2009
Amelia Garripoli, aka the

Amelia Garripoli, aka the Bellwether, has a fabulous collection of rigid heddle links here:

therigidheddle.tumblr.com/

If you backtrack to April 2009 you will find the first in a series of articles on drafts and rigid heddles. (That is if you don't get sidetracked by other articles first, lol!)

I would recommend finding yourself a good weaving book, and one of the best is Betty Davenports "Hands on Rigid Heddle Weaving" followed up by "Textures and Patterns  for the Rigid Heddle". This will give you an excellent grounding in using a rigid heddle loom that will allow you to stretch your skills and explore what this versatile loom has to offer.

Good luck, and go and have fun!

wilowind's picture
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I have both of those books. I'm still in the learning phase. And I did find some videos online of using drafts with rigid heddles. Thanks for all your help. Its much appreciated.

 

Cathy

 
DebraEmanon's picture
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Thanks

This explanation was wonderful.  Thank you.

debmcclintock's picture
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To add to what has been

To add to what has been written don't forget sometimes drafts are presented in tie up form OR lift plan form in the treadling portion.  For the rigid heddle you want to be able look at the lift plan since it shows you a thread by thread manipulation.

-Tie up shows how the treadles are tied to the shaft.  

-Lift plan shows what threads are lifted in the threading row by row and can be tied up a variety of ways.  

This is also a good site for hints which our structo group leader pointed out.  Note that this is presented in lift plan form but isn't called a lift plan.  You have to learn how to recognize the difference between tie up and lift plan.