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Raddle - make your own or rather DRILL your own

debmcclintock's picture

Someone wrote about making a raddle, I found a photo of my raddle that I made over 20 years ago.  It is a staircase bannister that was marked off in one inch increments.  I staggered them to make it easy to count and resigned myself to drilling ALOT of holes.  I cut and sanded ALOT of dowels and haven't looked back since.  I meant to finish it off with some varnish but never made the time and haven't really suffered from it.

This set up is also shown on my old 60" Cranbrook loom.  The raddle and the lease sticks are sitting in a support brace I made by gluing blocks of wood together.  I left enough room so the lease sticks and raddle could shift to warn me about tension issues but not too much to create trouble.  When I needed the support I clamped it on the loom, when I did not need it everything came off and was placed out of the way.  enjoy  Deb

sequel's picture
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Joined: 06/09/2009
Wow, I always intended to

Wow, I always intended to make a jig like this to hold the raddle and lease sticks.  I'm glad somebody did it!

I make my raddles with whatever nice smooth straight stick presents itself.  I use a drill press to drill the holes, but I'm too lazy to file the heads off the nails or cut dowels as you have.  I just poke the nails into the wood and tap them in so they are all, or mostly all, the same height. 

I make lease sticks from screen door spline and round over the edges that aren't already rounded over.  To get them really smooth, I sand them, then mist them to raise the grain.  When dry, repeat this using progressively finer abrasives.  I usually use polyurethane varnish and smooth that with 0000 steel wool for a really smooth lease stick.

 

Erica Tiedemann's picture
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Joined: 04/15/2010
Thank you, Deb! I'm trying to

Thank you, Deb!

I'm trying to figure out how to put a raddle on my old 60" cranbrook.

It looks like the raddle raises the warp above the level of the back beam.  Does that have any adverse effects?

-Erica

 

 

Joined: 05/29/2009
 YOu don't usually leave the

 YOu don't usually leave the raddle on the loom when weaving - the lease sticks you do.

My Cranbrook has a slot up on the top rear cross member - I've fitted my trusty old raddle to slide into that slot and warp the loom over the top.

 

debmcclintock's picture
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Joined: 06/08/2009
Hi Erica, couple of thoughts

Hi Erica, couple of thoughts for you since you have the 60" cranbrook, I sold mine before we moved and I missssss it!

I used a staircase banister as the base for my raddle since it had to cover such a wide span, for a smaller loom that would probably be overkill but since I wanted to avoid any type of "sway" in my warp as I wound it on I went for the bannister since it was thicker.  It's worked well for over 20 years.  When I am not using it it stores very nicely up on top of the loom.

The photo above shows my loom in the process of warping.  Once I am threaded thru the shafts and reed I do pull the raddle off the loom.  Since everything is clamped on it comes off easily below the warp by turning the raddle down and sliding it off.  I am of the school that leaves the lease sticks in until I have checked my threading and then I pull them out of the way.  I do put them back on before I cut a project off since it usually makes it easy to tie on another warp or rethread the loom.  I do this with fine warp and with rug warp, haven't felt the need to leave it in.

The way the raddle rises over the back beam has no effect on the wind on of the warp.  I do put the lease sticks in front of the raddle so that threads get separated properly and go thru the raddle and feed down to the warp beam in a orderly manner.  You are more concerned with the tension being even.  No one will ever know that the warp took a different path when they look at your cloth!

Enjoy  Deb Mc 

Erica Tiedemann's picture
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Joined: 04/15/2010
Thank you both Sara and

Thank you both Sara and Deb,

I started weaving with a friend who left the raddle on -- or maybe it was just the leas sticks.  She had several looms and a lot going on.  It's hard to remember.  But it seemed like I ought to take the raddle off.  I like both suggestions and going over the top makes a lot of sense. 

I'm so glad to have found people who have experience with my loom.  I put it together with a partial set of instructions while I was pregnant.  When it came to tying up the harnesses I couldn't figure out what I should be doing to save my life.  I'd gotten too big to crawl around in the loom anyway and I put it off for another 6 or 8 months by which time I'd thought it through.  Since then I've shown that I can make it go, but I'm still not pushing the loom to it's limit.

I've been warping front to back, but I got it into my head that I should start working back to front.  Thank you again for sharing your experience.

-Erica

sequel's picture
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Joined: 06/09/2009
I sometimes leave the raddle

I sometimes leave the raddle in on my Minerva because it seems to improve the tension on the lower shed, otherwise the lower shed can be a little slack and cause the shuttle to submarine because the Minerva does not have a shuttle race.

cstegert's picture
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Joined: 06/11/2009
My husband build me a raddle

My husband build me a raddle for my 60" Glimarkra.  On the ends, a hole was drilled through the raddle and the back beam.  A nail is placed in the hole that secures it from moving.  I too leave the raddle on the loom during weaving.  I did have to make some minor adjustments to the level of the harnesses for the added height.  The raddle becomes an extension of the loom.  I have not had an problems with the set up even weaving at 60-72 epi.

 

Joined: 05/29/2009
 While it probably doesn't

 While it probably doesn't hurt by leaving the raddle on the loom, it makes sense to remove it if you have more than one loom. I have one 48" raddle and use it on 6 different looms. I can't afford to tie it up on just one of them.

And yes, on a narrower loom, it just hangs out over the ends until I'm done with it.

Weaverchick007's picture
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Joined: 07/24/2010
Love this!

I am in the very beginning stages of making a raddle...having just found out that I need one!  :-D  I was going to sand and stain a strip of hard red oak.  I love the bannister idea no sanding!  I also love the ideas here for supports...both the clamped on wooden jig and the nail !

Nice lease sticks too.  I may start a thread as to how to make nice smooth lease sticks...I'm especially looking for a way to avoid sanding since I hate sanding wood!

 

~D

debmcclintock's picture
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Joined: 06/08/2009
Smooth lease sticks

Smooth lease sticks = bamboo cut in half or even the full stick....haunt your local garden store or nursury.  

OR for a contemporary material look for thick plexi glass/plastic rods, they need to have enough "oomp" to not sway on you but no sanding required there either....welcome to the world of tormenting your local hardware store for items