Welcome Guest. Login/Register.
17 weavers online | help

Plans for a bobbin winder

26 replies [Last post]
JoAnnaWeaves's picture
Offline
Joined: 06/08/2009

I have been looking at the Schacht hand bobbin winders for a while but I just can't bring myself to buy one. It seems like a lot of money for a simple tool. I know for certain that I like them. It's what we use in the weaving studio at school so knowing that I like it is not an issue. My husband thinks he might be able to build one for me but he's not really sure how to go about it.

What I'm wondering is if anyone else has built one or knows of plans on the internet to build one?

I have been using an electric drill up until now, but for Christmas I received a Bluster Bay Mini End Feed shuttle and I've quickly discovered that winding pirns does not work on an electric drill (or at least not one the one I have access to) It's too imprecise. The drill is fine for bobbins, but I want to use my new toy and winding by hand takes FOREVER. :( Any ideas would be helpful. 
Thanks in advance,
JoAnna

Joined: 05/29/2009
 The price for a good bobbin

 The price for a good bobbin winder comes from its precision. Precision comes with building that device over and over until the maker gets it just right.

As far as I know, there are no home building plans for bobbin or pirn winders out there.

francorios's picture
Online
Joined: 06/08/2009
Go to Curious Weaver

Go to Curious Weaver archives

http://curiousweaver.id.au/archives/2

Download the following PDF (free download)

Curiousweaver Issue 3 November 1995 PDF 570k 20 pages.
This third issue features:

  • Japanese Card Braiding
  • Marudai Japanese Braiding
  • Pyramid Christmas Tree Decorations
  • Make your own Weaving Equipment (easy electric bobbin winders!)
  • Native Dye Plant Garden at the Top End
  • Cramming and Spacing
  • Bedouin Saha Weave
  • Nepalese Tapestry Sash
  • Chinese ‘Double Coin’ Knot

Or consider using a hand powered drill?

Or make hand powered cardboard spinner like my spinning wheel but arrange it for winding bobbins.

http://www.rabbitgeek.com/charka.html

Have a good day!

philgreer's picture
Offline
Joined: 12/24/2009
 i just use a cordless drill,

 i just use a cordless drill, and i use the sticks that you put party balloons on for bobbins.

i find the sticks are better then straws because they are a lot stronger and have the strength to stick right into the end of the  drill and dont fold or bend when winding on yarn or thread.

cheers

Phil 

Karren K. Brito's picture
Offline
Joined: 11/13/2009
Some of us use our spinning

Some of us use our spinning wheels.

Joined: 08/27/2009
I have a non electric drill,

I have a non electric drill, the old kind with the gears. I clamp it into my vise in the workshop with the rotating handle sticking up. I put a 1/4" dowel in the drill and use that to wind bobbins. It is not as quick as the bobbin winders I have used in classes, but it is faster than doing it by hand, or cleaning up the mess from using the electric drill. (think dropped drill, tangled fiber, blue words!)

If you were to put a couple of flat spots on the drill handle so it could be clamped on a table, that is a possible solution.

Best solution is to buy the good prin winder, either used, or new.

Sharon

JoAnnaWeaves's picture
Offline
Joined: 06/08/2009
I appreciate the comments.

I appreciate the comments. Unfortunately, the electric drill that I have does not work for winding quills. It's too imprecise. It doesn't stop immediately when you take your finger off the trigger.

At this point, I'm still thinking about having my husband build a hand winder. I really prefer being able to control the speed myself, rather than depending on a mechanical motor. I'm not really concerned about the quality of the bobbin winder he would build. He's a woodworker...Precision is part of the job. :)
Thanks for the advice!
JoAnna

philgreer's picture
Offline
Joined: 12/24/2009
Just a quick thought for

Just a quick thought for you....

i have also used a cordless screwdriver before. you can pick them up from the hardware stores and they dont cost to much at all, you can get really cheap ones for about 10 to 16 dollars.  the only possible downfall is that you need to tape your bobbin onto the end. and they dont rotate as fast as a cordless drill does. but you never know.. everyones different

when i wind bobbins i like to have them wound in 2 seconds flat.. so to speak..

good luck!  :-)

francorios's picture
Online
Joined: 06/08/2009
Joanna, Check out this PDF at

Joanna,

Check out this PDF at Spinoff magazine. It shows how to make a simple little spinning wheel

Building a little great wheel by Margaret Heathman

http://spinoffmagazine.com/media/p/138/showcontent.aspx

It has a design that your woodworker husband can easily modify to what you want to do.  For instance, use a smaller diameter wheel and don't put legs on it. You may have to experiment with what size quill (knitting needle) to install on the little great wheel for bobbins.

You will have to register as a user at Spinoff, but it does not cost any money to register.

Have a good day!

Michael White's picture
Online
Joined: 06/26/2009
JoAnna, I hand operated

JoAnna, I hand operated bobbin winder is very easy to make. Would you like me to sent you instructions.

Michael

JoAnnaWeaves's picture
Offline
Joined: 06/08/2009
Michael, If you have

Michael,

If you have instructions, I would GLADLY accept them. :) That would be wonderful!!
JoAnna

Michael White's picture
Online
Joined: 06/26/2009
I will try an get them to

I will try an get them to you, no later them Monday.

Michael

Thumper70's picture
Offline
Joined: 06/10/2009
I've not built one - but -

I've not built one - but - like you can't bring myself to buy one - the price is simply unreasonable.

However, I've got two ideas to try you might get to it before I do.

A) an old style hand whisk - you know the cranked ones with the cogs . . . take one of the beaters off (easily done with a hack saw or a dremmel) and flatten the tangs of the reamaining one so it will hold the quill snugly. et voila - you have a bobbin winder.

B) the bobbin winder feature on my sewing machine (I've got a Jannon - sp?) is about the right design to do it in a few minutes. I've not yet tried it but think that it will work rather well. click click, zip zip et voila.

 

Alexis

Michael White's picture
Online
Joined: 06/26/2009
JoAnna, I have posted a link

JoAnna, I have posted a link to making a bobbin winder on the DIY Looms group page. I will also post it here.

www.handweaver.us/bobbin_winder.htm

If this is not what you are looking for. We can change it to a double ended one also.

Michael

 

francorios's picture
Online
Joined: 06/08/2009
Bravo! Very nice bobbin

Bravo!

Very nice bobbin winder, Michael!

Have a good day!

JoAnnaWeaves's picture
Offline
Joined: 06/08/2009
Michael, Thank you so much!

Michael,

Thank you so much! This looks like it will be just what I'm looking for.

I do have some questions. What is the difference between the single and double ended bobbin winders? And do I need a double ended one to wind pirns? If so, does the double ended one wind bobbins as well? Basically, I need to be able to wind both bobbins and pirns. I only just got an EFS and so I'm not sure what I'm doing yet. :)  I do love it though!! Anyway, I should probably already know all this, but I haven't had access to a bobbin winder since I've been weaving at home and I've never tried a double ended one. Any information would be wonderful.
Thanks so much!
JoAnna

Michael White's picture
Online
Joined: 06/26/2009
Joanna, You do not need a

Joanna, You do not need a double ended bobbin winder to wind your pirns for your end feed shuttle. That said if your pirns are really long and you get a got of wobble trying to wind your pirns. Then you could think about adding a piece to stabilize the tip. Here are pictures of each. www.schachtspindle.com/our_products/bobbin_winders.php  If your husband has a question about doing the grove let me know.

Michael

 Joanna, you may want to read the note on the bottom of this page: www.villagespinweave.com/IBS/SimpleCat/Product/asp/hierarchy/0604/product-id/36718207.html

 about pirns.

Michael

 

JoAnnaWeaves's picture
Offline
Joined: 06/08/2009
Thanks so much for your help

Thanks so much for your help and patience with me. :) I have a Bluster Bay mini end feed shuttle. I don't think there will be a problem with it being too long. The paper pirns it uses are not much longer than the 4" plastic bobbins I use in my Leclerc boat shuttles. I'll let you know if my husband has any questions about the plans.

JoAnna

Joanne Hall's picture
Offline
Joined: 06/11/2009
Hi JoAnna, If you make a

Hi JoAnna,

If you make a winder with a thin spindle, you can wind anything.  You just put on a cardboard quill and then you can put the plastic bobbins and end feed shuttle pirns on top.  So, with the thin spindle you can wind all types of quills and bobbins.  With a thick spindle, you cannot wind the cardboard quills.  It is even harder to make paper quills, as they collapse when they are so thick. 

And you may like the cardboard quills more than the plastic bobbins.  They are far more quiet, are easy to wind, do not catch in the shuttle as you are weaving and they can be cut to size.

Joanne

TinaHilton's picture
Offline
Joined: 05/12/2009
I bought mine on Ebay from a

I bought mine on Ebay from a guy who makes them using a sewing machine motor, I believe.  It's a very good bobbin winder for a lower cost.  The seller's name is hollyhockhillfarm.  Here's one that he has listed:  cgi.ebay.com/Electric-bobbin-winder-weaving-loom_W0QQitemZ270516821106QQcmdZViewItemQQptZLH_DefaultDomain_0

(not affiliated, just a happy customer)

 

Ellen's picture
Offline
Joined: 08/12/2009
I have often wondered

I have often wondered -because of my language barrier, probably - but what is the difference betweeen a bobbon and a pirn? When I wind yarn to use as weft I use a hard carton cylinder and wind the yarn on by hand using the only Scandinavian instrument I have ever come across for this, which says "Oxberg, Anderson's Vävskedsfabrik", I think the same place that now sells the Glimakra looms over here.

Ellen

Michael White's picture
Online
Joined: 06/26/2009
Ellen, a pirn is used for end

Ellen, a pirn is used for end feed shuttles and in most cases it is tapered. www.villagespinweave.com/IBS/SimpleCat/Product/asp/hierarchy/0604/product-id/36718207.html On the other hand a bobbin has shoulders on both ends, unless it uses a tube.

Joined: 06/08/2009
And then there is the quill -

And then there is the quill - a piece of paper used instead of the cardboard tube. Cheapest, easiest, fastest...

Ellen's picture
Offline
Joined: 08/12/2009
Thanks Michael. The picture

Thanks Michael. The picture in your link says it all.

And yes, Kerstin, I started out with paper quills, and of course they are cheapest, but I certainly don't find them easiest, I always spent tome fumbling with getting them started, so to me they were not fastet. I loved getting hold of the carton cylinders :-) 

inscribson's picture
Offline
Joined: 09/13/2010
I also use paper quills I

I also use paper quills I made. I simply cut an 8.5x11 inch piece of paper into quarters, rolled them up, taped them shut, and use my sewing machine's bobbin winder to load them. It isn't the prettiest way but it is fast enough. I have to sometimes hold the top of the quill with my finger or a pencil tip to keep it from wobbling.

Sommardahl's picture
Offline
Joined: 06/18/2013
Sewing machine bobbin winder idea.

I have been wondering about the possibility of using my sewing machine bobbin winder to wind bobbins for my new boat shuttle. I am waiting on the shuttle & pack of bobbins to arrive now. Will you say how you thought this could be done. I can see the bobbin winder on my machine will need to be supplemented by some kind of object to allow it to hold the bobbin firmly. Eager to learn your idea on this.

ehalseth's picture
Offline
Joined: 08/23/2011
Home mde bobbin winder

My son created one for me using a sewing machine motor with a cone fashioned of epoxy on the machine shaft. The end for holding the pirns is a flywheel from another motor. A spring over the shaft of that keeps the tension on the pirns. It's fast and practical.

Ellen