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What are the odds?

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TinaHilton's picture
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Joined: 05/12/2009

Years ago I bought a skein of soy silk and a skein of bamboo that I intended to make a scarf with.  I wanted something fairly simple to put on my table loom and decided this yarn had aged enough and needed to be used.  Plus the colors are lovely for a spring scarf.  On the label, I had written a suggested epi of 10, The warp is variegated, so I wanted the pattern to be fairly simple to show it off.  I decided on a 1/1/1/1/1/3 twill but was debating whether I should thread it as pointed or straight.  For inspiration, I decided to search the internet for other possible patterns and setts and found a reference to a Handwoven magazine from 2005 with a scarf using this yarn.  I have all the Handwovens from 2004, but I'm not very good at putting my magazines back in their binder after reading them.  But it was right where it should have been.  I found the article and discovered that the scarf project in question used the variegate soy silk yarn as warp and the solid bamboo as weft -- just like I planned.  And the sett was the same as I planned.  And the pattern was the same too! The author did use different colors, but otherwise our brains were in sync.

I'm feeling very confident about this project now.  Now to get to winding that warp.

Tina

celtinbirks's picture
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Joined: 01/29/2011
Odds

That is pretty cool when things just seem to "turn out" like that.  Have fun.

Candace

ReedGuy's picture
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Joined: 01/13/2012
Things just fall in line

Things just fall in line sometimes. :) Maybe the moon and sun are in alignment, or maybe it was just the full moon on Friday that did it. ;)

Happy weaving. :)

Bonnie Inouye's picture
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Joined: 06/15/2009
good memory

Wow, you have a good memory, Tina.

Just in case your taste in weaving patterns has changed since 2005, you could also thread and/or treadling an 8-shaft network drafted twill or an a 5-end advancing twill and use that same tie-up. Did the article show a straight threading? My personal preference is avoid threading points with such an open sett.

Bonnie

TinaHilton's picture
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Joined: 05/12/2009
The article does show a

The article does show a straight threading Bonnie.  I thought it would be best to keep the pattern somewhat simple since the warp is variegated.  I hadn't checked the floats for the point twill threading, but I realize now that could have been a problem.  I need to remember to check for float length before finalizing the pattern.  I usually do, but sometimes I just forget.

Bonnie Inouye's picture
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Joined: 06/15/2009
variegated warp

 A straight threading is easy. You could sample some advancing and network drafted twill treadlings. When I work with multicolored dyed warps and want the design to show, I choose a weft with strong contrast in value, often a finer weft than the warp.

If your variegated warp yarn includes some dark colors and some quite light, it will be hard to find a weft with contrast to all of the warp. That's when it helps to have a very short repeat in the threading like a straight draw. You might not see the design in some areas of cloth but you will in other areas. My book shows how I worked with a straight draw and lots of different tie-ups and treadlings. I've woven those drafts with dyed warps and liked the results. (I know you have my book.) Keeping the draft simple is playing it safe, but you might have fun experimenting with this one.

Bonnie

Joined: 05/29/2009
Tina, Your eperience is proof

Tina,

Your eperience is proof that it is quite possible to design a weaving project that another weaver has done in the same or very similar manner. That is why it is pretty near impossible to be "completely" original - and also shows that you're an experienced enough weaver to have similar expectations for similar material.